Who's up and who's down this week?

Who's up and who's down this week?

Crossing the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge to vote for the biggest Winners & Loser.
August 30, 2018

Who was this week's biggest winner?

Zephyr Teachout
40%
Alessandra Biaggi, Zellnor Myrie & Jessica Ramos
26%
Corey Johnson
14%
Wendy Neu & Steve Nislick
11%
Sean Patrick Maloney
9%
Cynthia Nixon
1%
Julia Salazar
1%
Marty Dilan
1%
SDv strth
1%
Tish James
1%
Write-in
2%

Who was this week's biggest loser?

Jared Kushner
46%
Richard Malone
16%
Steve Squitieri
13%
Tayron Hazel & Brianne Pawson
13%
Andrew Cuomo
1%
Cuomo
1%
Cynthia Nixon
1%
Donald Trump
1%
Eric Schneider man
1%
Jeff Klein
1%
Julia Salazar
1%
Salazar
1%
Upstate NY
1%
Write-in
8%
Robert Gala
5%

Insults were flying at the one and only gubernatorial debate. “Can you stop interrupting?” “Can you stop lying?” But nobody felt as insulted as upstaters, who said their issues weren’t included at all … unless you think the Governor Mario M. Cuomo and/or Tappan Zee Bridge is upstate, in which case, much the debate was focused on it. So to continue the theme, we’ve got a city-centric Winners & Losers list this week – plus a guy from Buffalo.

Winners: 
Alessandra Biaggi, Zellnor Myrie & Jessica Ramos

The New York Times doesn’t always pick winners. After all, a 100 percent record on endorsements may lead to speculation about clairvoyance. But to get the backing of the paper of record is no small achievement. Biaggi, Myrie and Ramos have obviously proven their credentials and can now add The Gray Lady to their list of endorsements as they seek to unseat former members of the Independent Democrat Conference. The Times also recently endorsed progressive Zephyr Teachout for attorney general, so it looks like the paper is betting on the progressive activism to win out in the state primaries.

Corey Johnson

What does it take to get Gov. Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to work together? An easy political win at the expense of the state Senate GOP. But at the center of the rare instance of cooperation between the governor and the mayor was the New York City Council speaker, who cut a deal to pass a bill that will get 140 speed cameras outside city schools back up and running – a rebuke to the state Senate Republican conference that failed to act on the issue before the last legislative session.

Sean Patrick Maloney

The courts agreed that questioning whether the Hudson Valley congressman could run for two offices at once was “a cute thing to say” but ultimately “ridiculous.” So Maloney’s backup plan has been confirmed, and if he loses in the Sept. 13 attorney general primary, as he’s widely expected to, then he can just switch Twitter accounts and jump right back into running for Congress like he was before this whole race began.

Wendy Neu & Steve Nislick

The founders of New Yorkers for Clean, Liveable and Safe Streets succeeded in an effort to require carriage horses to make pick-ups only inside Central Park rather than on Central Park South. While the horses will still have to trot to their West Side stables on city streets, the effort to ban horse carriages altogether has moved a few lengths forward.

Zephyr Teachout

For the second week in a row, Zephyr Teachout makes it on our winners list, and it’s only partially because her New York Daily News endorsement. During the state attorney general debate, each of her opponents chose to direct their only question at Teachout, suggesting she’s the candidate to beat despite her opponents’ years of experience and the fact that she’s “only been (a member of) the bar in New York State for about three days.”

Losers: 
Robert Gala

What is it with children of high-ranking government officials thinking they’re as important as their parents? There’s the Skelos kid, the Libous kid … even that honorary Cuomo kid. The latest in this troubling trend is Robert Gala, an EMT who reportedly impersonated a cop multiple times and deliberately avoided 911 calls – and is still getting paid. How’d he get past the scandals unscathed? Perhaps it has something to do with his dad, who’s a deputy assistant chief with the FDNY.

Jared Kushner

The Kushner family business, Kushner Cos., was fined $210,000 for routinely falsifying construction applications while Jared was running the show as CEO. The Department of Buildings cited Kushner Companies for 42 violations at 17 Manhattan- and Brooklyn-based sites, where tenants were supposed to be protected by rent-stabilization rules. Kushner Cos. made some convenient “paperwork errors” (e.g. falsifying permits and failing to register regulated apartments with the state) that helped the company skirt those rules so it could make renovations and take units out of rent regulation.

Richard Malone

As the Catholic Church comes under renewed scrutiny for child sexual abuse by its priests and coverups to protect the clergy instead of the children, the bishop of Buffalo has denied having anything to hide. But WKBW’s investigative reporting shows that Malone kept two priests in place despite allegations of misconduct – which means there are some holes in the holy man’s story. While Malone says he’s not going anywhere, the calls for his resignation are only getting louder – and a potential investigation might bring him down, anyway.

Tayron Hazel & Brianne Pawson

Just when it seemed that NYCHA had hit rock bottom and had nowhere to go but up, the troubled housing agency was hit with yet another scandal: employees at a Bronx housing project using it as “their own personal sex club – engaging in wild, boozy orgies inside offices, the groundskeepers shop and even empty apartments,” according to the Post. While the entire staff was reassigned, Tayron Hazel and Brianne Pawson were suspended for 30 days – the maximum punishment NYCHA could levy at this point.

Steve Squitieri

In proof that power and influence don’t always stand in the way of justice, the notorious trash hauling company Sanitation Salvage has had its license suspended in New York City. Trucks belonging to the company killed two men over the course of less than a year, in addition to 58 total collisions and 11 injuries since early 2016. Squitieri’s company is now suing the city, calling the suspension a “death sentence.” Squitieri should just be thankful he’s not in or around one of his trucks, otherwise that sentence could be a literal one.

City & State
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