Power 100 – Albany 2016

Power 100

Power 100 – Albany 2016

Power 100 – Albany 2016

 

Putting together our annual Power 100 list for Albany is a lot of fun. We talk to sources we trust and get pitches from people – some with clear agendas and others with opaque objectives – that leave us scratching our heads. In the end, we take all the information we’ve gathered and have some grand discussions (even a few heated yelling matches) over who should be on the list, or who should be on top. This year we spent roughly 14 hours talking through the list in a series of seven meetings over the course of two months.

I mention all this because I want you to know how seriously we take this list. And not just because it’s fun, but because understanding who has influence and power helps shed at least a little light on why some things get done, and others don’t. And, as our list makes clear, almost nothing in Albany gets done solely on merit. It requires political maneuvering that often involves a handful of people, if not dozens, weighing in and helping craft a final decision – whether it’s a bill, a budget allocation or an implementation of policy.

Times may be changing, though. The overarching trend we noticed is that lobbyists, fundraisers and top lawmakers don’t have as tight a grip on control