The 2021 New York City Power 100: 51-100

The 2021 New York City power 100
The 2021 New York City power 100
Taiga/Shutterstock
The 2021 New York City power 100
Power 100

The 2021 New York City Power 100: 51-100

The political players who are saving their city.

51. Henry Garrido

Executive Director, District Council 37

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Henry Garrido
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Henry Garrido
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Henry Garrido
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Henry Garrido
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Photo by Clarence Elie Rivera

When New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio suggested he would need to lay off 22,000 workers by October to stabilize the city budget, Henry Garrido rushed to avert the bloodletting. The leader of the city’s largest municipal employees union said that would be unacceptable and pressured the mayor to postpone the cuts in order to buy more time to find $1 billion in savings. They made a deal to stave off layoffs through June 2021, although concerns about early retirement packages loom.

52. Gary LaBarbera

President, Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York

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President of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York Gary LaBarbera
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President of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York Gary LaBarbera
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President of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York Gary LaBarbera
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President of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York Gary LaBarbera
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President of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York Gary LaBarbera
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Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York

The construction industry has been pummeled by the coronavirus pandemic, with new construction filings down 22% from last year amounting to a 10-year low with little hope for a quick rebound. Yet Gary LaBarbera has helped craft worker safety measures to keep projects moving, launched a new apprenticeship program, supported new projects like a natural gas power plant in Queens and the Crown Heights towers, and secured a long-sought state prevailing wage law that will go into effect next year.

53. Jacques Jiha

New York City Budget Director

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Jacques Jiha
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Jacques Jiha
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Jacques Jiha
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Jacques Jiha
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Mark McCarty Photography

When people are comparing the city’s budgetary outlook to the mid-1970s, you know you have a problem. Jacques Jiha, the former finance commissioner, succeeded Melanie Hartzog in October and set about resolving the city’s fiscal crisis. He has already sought to eliminate interest on some property tax payments, and his administration cut labor costs by $1 billion by putting off borrowing. He also is contending with next year's $3.8 billion budget gap, which a January preliminary budget closes.

54. Stuart Appelbaum

President, Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union

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Stuart Appelbaum
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Stuart Appelbaum
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Stuart Appelbaum
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Stuart Appelbaum
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Stuart Appelbaum
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RWDSU

The retail industry was already struggling before the coronavirus pandemic, which temporarily shuttered many stores while e-commerce giants delivered necessities for many New Yorkers. Stuart Appelbaum kept the spotlight on Amazon and meatpacking companies for failing to keep safe work environments or provide enough personal protective equipment and demanded store owners enforce mask mandates instead of letting workers diffuse conflicts. His next campaign will be to help Amazon warehouse workers who want to unionize.

55. Al Sharpton

Founder and President, National Action Network

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The Rev. Al Sharpton
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The Rev. Al Sharpton
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The Rev. Al Sharpton and other members of the clergy stepped up when they saw the state wasn't doing enough community outreach on the COVID-19 vaccine.
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The Rev. Al Sharpton
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The Rev. Al Sharpton and other members of the clergy stepped up when they saw the state wasn't doing enough community outreach on the COVID-19 vaccine.
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Celeste Sloman

The Rev. Al Sharpton is one of the most prominent civil rights leaders not just in New York but nationally, standing up for victims of police brutality and calling for social justice. His message is resonating now more than ever, with last year’s Black Lives Matter protests drawing attention to systemic racism in America. The MSNBC host is also sought after for endorsements, and is already playing a role in New York City’s crowded Democratic primary for mayor. 

56. Andrew Rigie

Executive Director, New York City Hospitality Alliance

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Andrew Rigie, executive director of the NYC Hospitality Alliance.
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Andrew Rigie, executive director of the NYC Hospitality Alliance.
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Andrew Rigie, executive director of the NYC Hospitality Alliance.
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Andrew Rigie, executive director of the NYC Hospitality Alliance.
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Andrew Rigie, executive director of the NYC Hospitality Alliance.
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Submitted

The coronavirus shutdowns caused New York to shed more than half a million hospitality jobs. Leisure and hospitality has rebounded nationally but not as quickly in the city, putting the spotlight on Andrew Rigie’s efforts to keep his industry afloat. Rigie has lobbied for dedicated grants to restaurants from Congress and protested the state’s closure of indoor dining – and the governor recently showed a willingness to reopen in the five boroughs.

57. Ritchie Torres

Member of Congress

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City Council Member  Ritchie Torres
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City Council Member Ritchie Torres
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City Council Member Ritchie Torres
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City Council Member Ritchie Torres
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City Council Member Ritchie Torres
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Emil Cohen/New York City Council

The Bronx politician made history with Mondaire Jones as the two first openly gay Black men elected to Congress. Rep. Ritchie Torres had burnished his credentials in the City Council investigating NYCHA and empowering city watchdogs. He framed his primary against City Council Member Ruben Diaz Sr. – among other candidates – as a battle between good and evil. Torres doesn’t fit easily in any category, but identifies as progressive and pro-Israel – and not eager to join AOC’s squad.

58. Harry Giannoulis

President, The Parkside Group

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President of the Parkside Group Harry Giannoulis
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President of the Parkside Group Harry Giannoulis
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President of the Parkside Group Harry Giannoulis
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President of the Parkside Group Harry Giannoulis
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President of the Parkside Group Harry Giannoulis
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Parkside Group

Two years after helping flip the state Senate in 2018, Democratic campaign consultant Harry Giannoulis celebrated another successful election cycle. He had to wait a little longer this year, but when all the mail-in ballots were counted, Democrats held a veto-proof supermajority. Now the Parkside Group co-founder and his team will be tracking the state’s supposedly less partisan redistricting effort as well as scores of City Council, borough and citywide primary races.

59. Félix Matos Rodríguez

Chancellor, City University of New York

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CUNY Chancellor Félix V. Matos Rodríguez
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CUNY Chancellor Félix V. Matos Rodríguez
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CUNY Chancellor Félix V. Matos Rodríguez
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CUNY Chancellor Félix V. Matos Rodríguez
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CUNY Chancellor Félix V. Matos Rodríguez
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Chancellor Felix Matos Rodríguez made the tough decision to close CUNY campuses on March 11 after students petitioned to cancel in-person learning. Yet distance learning came with its own challenges for students. Meanwhile, the vast university system has struggled financially – Matos Rodríguez ordered furloughs for administrators and deferred a 2% salary increase for teachers, although two CUNY schools split a $60 million donation in December.

60. Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn

Chair, Kings County Democratic Party

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Rodnyese Bichotte
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Rodnyese Bichotte
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Guerin Blask

Assembly Member Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn, who leads the Brooklyn Democratic Party, has cultivated ties with Mayor Bill de Blasio and Public Advocate Jumaane Williams and sought to unify factions in a politically fragmented borough. The Haitian American lawmaker also helped win a number of races in Brooklyn in 2020 and will be looking for more in 2021. Yet she also made headlines for a battle over filling committee seats, which came to a head in two contentious 13-hour Zoom meetings. 

61. Jason Goldman

Chief of Staff, New York City Council

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Chief of Staff to the New York City Council Jason Goldman
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Chief of Staff to the New York City Council Jason Goldman
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Chief of Staff to the New York City Council Jason Goldman
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Chief of Staff to the New York City Council Jason Goldman
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Chief of Staff to the New York City Council Jason Goldman
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Chief of Staff to the New York City Council Jason Goldman

As the knowledgeable and well-connected chief of staff to New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, Jason Goldman keeps the legislative body running and helps manage which bills advance – a task that grew more complicated when the coronavirus pandemic required a shift to remote hearings. And while Goldman won’t be joining a Johnson administration next year – the council speaker ended his mayoral bid – he is sure to remain a political player into 2022.

62. Michael Dowling

CEO, Northwell Health

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Northwell Health’s Michael Dowling has long been an ally of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and the governor relied on the veteran health care executive as perhaps his closest outside adviser in developing a hospital-driven strategy to stall the spread of COVID-19. Dowling’s vast health care network has treated over 50,000 COVID-19 patients, including 16,000 for inpatient treatment, by July, a situation Dowling described to CNBC as “all hell broke loose.” 

63. Jon Del Giorno & Vincent Pitta

Founding Partners, Pitta Bishop & Del Giorno

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Jon Del Giorno (left) and Vincent Pitta (right)
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Jon Del Giorno (left) and Vincent Pitta (right)
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Jon Del Giorno (left) and Vincent Pitta (right)
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Jon Del Giorno (left) and Vincent Pitta (right)
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Jon Del Giorno (left) and Vincent Pitta (right)
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Jon Del Giorno and Vincent Pitta will be in demand during the busiest campaign year in a decade. The powerhouse duo handle labor, campaign finance and election compliance matters as well as the concerns of restaurants, hotels, health care, construction, sports and entertainment companies – in other words, everyone who is trying to navigate how to run their business in the middle of a public health crisis. They’re both known for their philanthropy too.

64. Carlo Scissura

President and CEO, New York Building Congress 

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Carlo Scissura
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New York Building Congress

Carlo Scissura lobbied hard to oppose a construction moratorium during the coronavirus pandemic while working to ensure construction sites had safety protocols in place. New York restarted nonessential construction in June, but 2020 had the lowest construction activity in a decade. Scissura has also expressed concerns about political opposition sidelining major projects in the city, but he’s optimistic about infrastructure projects like Moynihan Train Hall stimulating the economy this year.

65. Rich Maroko

President, New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council

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Rich Maroko
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Rich Maroko
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Rich Maroko took the reins of the Hotel Trades Council after Peter Ward retired in August with the hospitality industry in freefall. New York’s average occupancy rate hovered at 38%, and a significant number of hotels may never open again. Maroko was forced to close two employee health centers, but managed to get hotel owners to pay $500 million to employees, and pleaded for workers to receive vaccinations. 

66. Jamaal Bailey

Chair, Bronx Democratic Party

The Bronx Democratic Party has undergone a transformation in one of the underreported stories of 2020. A new generation of millennial politicians has swept into power, and state Sen. Jamaal Bailey is seeking to bridge the divide with the party’s older, establishment Democrats. Bailey wants to include more people in the party’s leadership. And as chair of the state Senate Codes Committee, he’s equally focused on police accountability, passing 50-a legislation in Albany.

67. Sochie Nnaemeka

New York State Director, Working Families Party

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Sochie Nnaemeka

The Working Families Party was forced to campaign for its survival after Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his allies passed rules that jeopardized the third party’s automatic ballot line. The party met the ballot threshold in November, leaving Sochie Nnaemeka to redouble her efforts to take on corporate Democrats and support progressive candidates in 2021. The party, which notched some major congressional victories in 2020, is now handing out endorsements for City Council candidates.

68. Bradley Tusk & Chris Coffey

Founder and CEO; Head of New York Practice, Tusk Strategies

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Bradley Tusk
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Bradley Tusk

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Chris Coffey
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Chris Coffey
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Chris Coffey
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Tusk Strategies

Bradley Tusk had success enabling Uber to thrive on New York City’s heavily regulated streets, so it makes sense that Andrew Yang – a techy mayoral candidate promising wholesale changes – would pique his interest. Tusk and Chris Coffey, who ran Michael Bloomberg’s 2009 mayoral campaign, are now advising Yang, who leads in an early survey of Democratic primary voters. Tusk Strategies has also worked with the Times Square Alliance, Bird and NYCLASS.

69. Keith Wright

Chair, Manhattan Democratic Party 

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Manhattan Democratic Party Chairman Keith Wright
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Manhattan Democratic Party Chairman Keith Wright
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Manhattan Democratic Party Chairman Keith Wright
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Manhattan Democratic Party Chairman Keith Wright
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Manhattan Democratic Party Chairman Keith Wright
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Keith Wright is not happy about New York City’s switch to a ranked choice voting system for local primaries and special elections, so he is backing a lawsuit brought by six City Council members to try to block the measure. Whatever the result, the Manhattan Democratic Party leader and former Assembly member will be in demand as candidates across dozens of district, borough, and citywide races will vie for his support.

70. Marisa Lago

Chair, City Planning Commission

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Marisa Lago
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Marisa Lago
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Marisa Lago
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Marisa Lago
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NYC Dept. of City Planning

The pandemic put a pause on the mayor’s neighborhood rezoning plan. But Marisa Lago led a September restart of the land use review process, reviving the administration’s proposal for the Gowanus rezoning. Other projects weren’t as lucky. The City Planning Commission approved the Industry City rezoning, but it failed after opposition in the City Council, while a vote for a Flushing waterfront district was delayed again. An Obama administration alum, Lago reportedly advised the Biden transition team.

71. Gale Brewer, Ruben Diaz Jr., James Oddo & Donovan Richards 

Borough Presidents, Manhattan; Bronx; Staten Island, Queens

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Gale Brewer, Ruben Diaz Jr., James Oddo & Donovan Richards
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Gale Brewer, Ruben Diaz Jr., James Oddo & Donovan Richards
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Gale Brewer, Ruben Diaz Jr., James Oddo & Donovan Richards
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Gale Brewer, Ruben Diaz Jr., James Oddo & Donovan Richards
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Gale Brewer, Ruben Diaz Jr., James Oddo & Donovan Richards
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Celeste Sloman; Office of the Bronx Borough President, Guillaume Federighi, Sean Pressley

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams might be mayor next year, and he’s not the only BP looking for a new job. Manhattan’s Gale Brewer, who has helped reshape local real estate projects, is running for her old Upper West Side City Council seat. The Bronx’s Ruben Diaz Jr., a cheerleader for development and job creation in his borough, had a shot at becoming mayor before stepping aside. All three Democrats – along with Staten Island’s leading advocate, Republican Jimmy Oddo – are term-limited. Meanwhile, their new Queens counterpart, Donovan Richards, will have to run again this year and already has at least one opponent in New York City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer.

72. Dennis Trainor

Vice President, CWA District 1

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Communications Workers of America

The Communications Workers Union chief has worked tirelessly to help stabilize New York City’s finances and those of the city’s denizens. Dennis Trainor stood with labor leaders and public officials to demand state and local aid in the federal CARES Act. And his union welcomed new members from climate change activist group Sunrise Movement and tech giant Google, the latter of which saw 226 employees sign CWA union cards after the company’s handling of sexual misconduct and internal dissent. 

73. Michael Woloz

President, CMW Strategies

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Michael Woloz
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Michael Woloz
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Michael Woloz
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Michael Woloz
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CMW Strategies LLC

The taxi industry that lobbyist Michael Woloz has spent much of his career promoting has been crippled during the pandemic - he told the New York Times business was the “worst it’s ever been.” But his firm, a government relations heavyweight that raked in $3.14 million in city lobbying compensation in 2019, has clients in banking, transportation, energy and real estate too, including the Hotel Association of New York, the Central Park Conservancy and Home Depot. CMW is also expanding in Albany. 

74. Brian Benjamin, Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, Zach Iscol, Brad Lander, Kevin Parker & David Weprin

New York City Comptroller Candidates

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Comptroller candidates
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Comptroller candidates
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Brian Benjamin, Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, Zach Iscol, Brad Lander, Kevin Parker & David Weprin
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Brian Benjamin, Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, Zach Iscol, Brad Lander, Kevin Parker & David Weprin
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Brian Benjamin, Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, Zach Iscol, Brad Lander, Kevin Parker & David Weprin
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State Senate Media Services; MCC For Comptroller; Pat Dunford; John McCarten/New York City Council; State Senate Media Services; Weprin 2021

Read story here.

75. Daniel Nigro

Fire Commissioner, Fire Department of the City of New York

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Daniel Nigro
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Daniel Nigro
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Daniel Nigro
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Daniel Nigro
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Daniel Nigro
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Rob Bennett for the Office of Mayor Bill de Blasio

Daniel Nigro is the commissioner of the nation’s largest fire department. Under his watch, FDNY firefighters and emergency technicians have been on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, exposing themselves to the virus to help New Yorkers in need. In March, 170 FDNY members contracted the coronavirus, and by December 5,700 had been infected and 12 had died. Nigro’s challenge will be encouraging vaccinations after 55% of firefighters internally surveyed said they don’t plan to take the vaccine. 

76. Patrick Lynch

President, Police Benevolent Association

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President of the New York City Police Benevolent Association Patrick Lynch
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President of the New York City Police Benevolent Association Patrick Lynch
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President of the New York City Police Benevolent Association Patrick Lynch
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President of the New York City Police Benevolent Association Patrick Lynch
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President of the New York City Police Benevolent Association Patrick Lynch
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a katz/Shutterstock

The head of New York City’s rank-and-file police union spent the summer defending his officers after police violently confronted George Floyd demonstrators, while also opposing a push to make police disciplinary records public. Patrick Lynch then went on to endorse President Donald Trump and speak at the Republican National Convention, saying Democrats “froze in the face of riots.” While he said he has no regrets about the endorsement, some officers are questioning his decision after the siege at the Capitol.

77. Susan Lerner

Executive Director, Common Cause New York

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Susan Lerner
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Nicole Millman

As awful as 2020 has been, good government advocates like Susan Lerner had much to celebrate, with more reforms on the way. State lawmakers reached a deal allowing automatic voter registration at DMVs, and barring an adverse legal ruling, voters will continue to be able to rank candidates in order of preference in city primaries and special elections. Lerner will have opinions on New York’s redistricting plan as well as proposals to speed up mail-in ballot counting and allow same-day registration.

78. Jon Silvan

Founding Partner and CEO, Global Strategy Group

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Founding Partner and CEO of Global Strategy Group Jon Silvan
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Founding Partner and CEO of Global Strategy Group Jon Silvan
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Founding Partner and CEO of Global Strategy Group Jon Silvan
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Founding Partner and CEO of Global Strategy Group Jon Silvan
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Founding Partner and CEO of Global Strategy Group Jon Silvan
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Global Strategy Group

Polling has gotten a bad rap in the media in recent elections, but accurate pollsters remain as valuable as ever to candidates and interest groups who want to get a snapshot of what the electorate is thinking. Expect Jon Silvan and his colleagues to play a crucial role in polling as well as shaping the 2021 elections – Scott Stringer has already hired Global Strategy Group to run his surveys.

79. Joseph Strasburg

President, Rent Stabilization Association

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President of the Rent Stabilization Association Joseph Strasburg
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President of the Rent Stabilization Association Joseph Strasburg
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President of the Rent Stabilization Association Joseph Strasburg
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President of the Rent Stabilization Association Joseph Strasburg
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President of the Rent Stabilization Association Joseph Strasburg
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Rent Stabilization Association

The pandemic-induced recession has brought economic pain upon millions of New Yorkers, but Joseph Strasburg doesn’t want policymakers to forget about independent property owners. New York lawmakers have extended an eviction and foreclosure moratorium multiple times during the pandemic, frustrating Strasburg, who argued the measure didn’t do enough to protect landlords from rising debt and delinquent bills. Strasburg is fending off new calls to cancel rent as COVID-19 rates spike again.

80. Edward Wallace

Co-Chair, New York Office, Greenberg Traurig

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Edward Wallace
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Edward Wallace
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Edward Wallace
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Courtesy Greenberg Traurig

With the help of an all-star team of highly experienced government hands that includes Mark Weprin, Robert Harding, John Mascialino and Jonathan Bing, Edward Wallace has positioned Greenberg Traurig as a top consulting and lobbying firm in New York City. Wallace, who is often sought after to assist on major real estate projects, has advised the city’s three largest private universities, Extell Development and Silverstein Properties on their development projects. 

81. Vincent Alvarez

President, New York City Central Labor Council

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President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
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President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
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President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
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President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
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President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
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Now celebrating his decadelong run as president of the central labor council, Vincent Alvarez represents the interests of 1.3 million union members. Those numbers could well increase as workers’ concern over workplace safety conditions during the pandemic, especially at hospitals and in other essential sectors, could spur them to join the labor movement. But a significant threat may be from the mayor threatening municipal layoffs to keep the city solvent.

82. Steven Rubenstein

President, Rubenstein

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Steven Rubenstein
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The death of Howard Rubenstein, the dean of public relations in New York City, was mourned in every corner of media, entertainment and the corporate world. His son Steven Rubenstein has built on his father’s legacy, representing New York’s most iconic institutions – including MoMa, JPMorgan Chase & Co., and The Partnership for New York City, to name but a few. As ABNY’s chair, he focused on census outreach while providing a platform for the city’s most powerful politicians.

83. Jed Walentas

CEO, Two Trees Management 

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Jed Walentas
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Jed Walentas
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Two Trees Management Co

The Walentas family made its name investing in Brooklyn’s fashionable DUMBO neighborhood. After the passing of matriarch Jane Walentas, who restored the Brooklyn Bridge Park carousel and brought arts programs to DUMBO, from lung cancer in July, her son Jed commemorated the legacy of his parents by giving away $200,000 each to five visionaries through the Walentas Family Foundation. Two Trees, meanwhile, ramped up development again this fall with a $194 million loan for its Ashland Place rental property.

84. Tony Utano

President, TWU Local 100 

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President of the TWU Local 100 Tony Utano
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President of the TWU Local 100 Tony Utano
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President of the TWU Local 100 Tony Utano
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President of the TWU Local 100 Tony Utano
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President of the TWU Local 100 Tony Utano
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Transit employees have been ravaged by the pandemic at extraordinarily high rates – nearly 25% may have been infected and some 140 MTA workers died. Their suffering spurred Tony Utano to fight for trains and stations to be disinfected and safe, threaten a work slowdown if the MTA slashed jobs, and sue to block the MTA from closing station booths. He’s also pushing for transit workers to receive the next round of COVID-19 vaccine doses. 

85. Anthony Constantinople & Perry Vallone

Principals, Constantinople & Vallone Consulting

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Anthony Constantinople & Perry Vallone
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Anthony Constantinople & Perry Vallone
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Anthony Constantinople & Perry Vallone
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Anthony Constantinople & Perry Vallone
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Constantinople & Vallone Consulting LLC

Anthony Constantinople and Perry Valone have carved out a swath of influence in Western Queens and beyond when it comes to land use, environmental, and educational matters. Vallone has the city’s land use and review policy in his blood and has been adept at helping nonprofits secure government funding. Meanwhile, Constantinople has a long record of environmental stewardship as a New York League of Conservation Voters board member.

86. John & Andrea Catsimatidis

President, Chair and CEO, Red Apple Group, Chair, Manhattan Republican Party

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Chairman and CEO of Red Apple Group John Catsimatidis
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Chairman and CEO of Red Apple Group John Catsimatidis
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Chairman and CEO of Red Apple Group John Catsimatidis
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Chairman and CEO of Red Apple Group John Catsimatidis
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Chairman and CEO of Red Apple Group John Catsimatidis
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Andrea Catsimatidis
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Andrea Catsimatidis
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Andrea Catsimatidis
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Celeste Sloman

Billionaire business mogul John Catsimatidis may be the Republican Party’s best shot at taking back City Hall, but it’s unclear whether the deep-pocketed donor will launch a mayoral campaign – in either party’s primary. His daughter, Andrea Catsimatidis, leads the loyal opposition in Manhattan as the GOP navigates a new era, with Donald Trump no longer in the White House – and not even returning to Trump Tower. 

87. Adriano Espaillat

Member of Congress

Rep. Adriano Espaillat won a seat on the House Appropriations Committee in December, giving him a role determining how federal funding is distributed. The Washington Heights Congress member is also taking a key role encouraging Upper Manhattan and Bronx communities that have been ravaged by high COVID-19 rates to get vaccinated this year. And he is demanding accountability for rioters who stormed the Capitol and police who used aggressive tactics with Black Lives Matter protesters. 

88. Camille Joseph-Goldman

Group Vice President, Government Affairs, Charter Communications

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Camille Joseph
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Camille Joseph
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Camille Joseph
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Charter Communications

Camille Joseph-Goldman has been Charter Communications’ go-to government affairs expert for nearly five years. She was instrumental in launching the Black News Channel, the nation’s first 24-hour news channel dedicated to stories important to the Black community, and in boosting internet speeds across the state. Joseph-Goldman last year touted Charter’s moves to hire 1,500 New Yorkers, raise its minimum wage to $20 an hour, and provide free high-speed internet to students doing remote learning due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

89. Sheena Wright

President and CEO, United Way of New York City

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Sheena Wright
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Sheena Wright
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Two weeks after the coronavirus forced New York into lockdown, the United Way launched a COVID-19 relief fund to support adversely affected communities. Sheena Wright and her colleagues continued to raise awareness about the deep racial disparities the pandemic exposed in health care and education with a report released in November. The United Way then joined forces with Black clergy to bring COVID-19 testing and contact tracing to churches in New York and four other cities.

90. Jamaal Bowman

Member of Congress

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Congressman-elect Jamaal Bowman
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Congressman-elect Jamaal Bowman
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Congressman-elect Jamaal Bowman
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Congressman-elect Jamaal Bowman
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Congressman-elect Jamaal Bowman
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Guerin Blask

The former Bronx middle school principal pulled off the upset of the primary cycle when he trounced 16-term incumbent Eliot Engel with 56% of the vote. Rep. Jamaal Bowman, who joined a state delegation that has grown younger and more progressive, made his mark calling for a reduction in police funding while criticizing former President Barack Obama. Yet while he’s a new member of the so-called “Squad,” he ultimately supported House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s bid to stay in power.

91. Laurie Cumbo

Majority Leader, New York City Council

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Laurie Cumbo
Laurie Cumbo
William Alatriste/New York City Council

As the official No. 2 in the New York City Council, Laurie Cumbo works with the body’s borough delegations and helps negotiate the budget. She’s the first Black woman to hold the leadership post. The Brooklyn lawmaker is one of several City Council members who have joined with community groups in filing a lawsuit aimed at blocking the new ranked-choice voting system in New York City primaries and special elections on the grounds that it will disadvantage people of color. 

92. Nicole Malliotakis

Member of Congress

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Congresswoman-elect Nicole Malliotakis
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Congresswoman-elect Nicole Malliotakis
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Congresswoman-elect Nicole Malliotakis
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Congresswoman-elect Nicole Malliotakis
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Congresswoman-elect Nicole Malliotakis
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Kathy Willens/AP/Shutterstock

Rep. Nicole Malliotakis’ victory over Max Rose was a bright spot for New York City Republicans thanks to a surge in turnout in Staten Island and southern Brooklyn. She has formed a conservative clique of Congress members called “Freedom Force” to counter socialism and the progressive “Squad.” Malliotakis is raising her visibility on cable news, but her opposition to certifying the presidential election of Joe Biden is fueling a bipartisan backlash. 

93. David Greenfield

CEO, Met Council 

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David Greenfield
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David Greenfield
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David Greenfield
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David Greenfield
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David Greenfield
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Met Council

David Greenfield has been at the forefront of distributing food to people in need since the COVID-19 pandemic began. The Met Council received $6 million from the city in April for food and protective equipment for volunteers, partnered with Uber to deliver 500 meals for Holocaust survivors and opened 101 food pantries for the high holy days. Greenfield has also criticized the city for replacing free groceries delivered to seniors with frozen meals.

94. James Merriman

CEO, New York City Charter School Center

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CEO of New York City Charter School Center James Merriman
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CEO of New York City Charter School Center James Merriman
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CEO of New York City Charter School Center James Merriman
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CEO of New York City Charter School Center James Merriman
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CEO of New York City Charter School Center James Merriman
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New York City Charter School Center

Merriman and other charter leaders worried their schools risked being boxed out in New York City with the state’s refusal to lift the charter cap. But the de Blasio administration’s chaotic school closing and reopening decisions, as well as its harried blended learning model made parents consider shifting their children to charter schools which have handled remote learning more smoothly. Merriman has also sued for charters to be included in city COVID-19 testing plans.

95. Louis Coletti

President and CEO, Building Trades Employers Association

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Louis J. Coletti
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Louis J. Coletti
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Louis J. Coletti
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Louis J. Coletti
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Louis J. Coletti
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Submitted

Lou Coletti, who represents contractors and subcontractors, warned in March that the pandemic could cost the construction industry billions. He helped get construction workers back to job sites safely during the first reopening phase and has sought to make a more inclusive workforce, but by the end of the year construction activity fell to its lowest level in a decade and a 22% decline from the first three quarters of 2019.

96. Mara Gay

Editorial Board Member, The New York Times 

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Mara Gay
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Mara Gay
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Mara Gay
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Mara Gay
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Mara Gay
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Celeste Sloman for the New York Times

The New York Times’ Mara Gay inspired readers with a series of poignant columns about her experience with and long recovery from COVID-19. The former Wall Street Journal reporter has also brought an unabashedly progressive view on local government, condemning brutal tactics police used to subjugate peaceful demonstrators and criticizing state lawmakers for scaling back bail reform legislation. She’ll have a say in the Times’ endorsements this year. 

97. Sid Davidoff

Founding Partner, Davidoff Hutcher & Citron

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Sid Davidoff
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Sid Davidoff
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Sid Davidoff
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Sid Davidoff
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Sid Davidoff
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Davidoff, Hutcher & Citron

Sid Davidoff has been a city steward for the past half century, but the veteran lobbyist acknowledges that whoever emerges from the June mayoral primary will face the most difficult job he can remember thanks to a spiraling budget crisis, civil unrest over police misconduct, and health and education inequities. Davidoff also mourned the death of his friend, former Mayor David Dinkins, whom he credited with keeping the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York.

98. Jason Laidley

Chief of Staff, State Sen. Jamaal Bailey

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Jason Laidley
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Jason Laidley
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Jason Laidley
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Jason Laidley
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Jason Laidley
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Dominque Maddox

As state Sen. Jamaal Bailey has steadily become a force in city and state politics, spearheading groundbreaking criminal justice reforms and recently taking over as the leader of the Bronx Democratic Party, he has often relied on a trusted ally, Jason Laidley. Laidley, who serves as Bailey’s chief of staff, is also a favorite of the Bronx’s political establishment at a time when younger politicians are taking the reins from members of the borough’s old guard. 

99. Murad Awawdeh & Rovika Rajkishun

Interim Co-Executive Directors, New York Immigration Coalition

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Murad Awawdeh
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Murad Awawdeh
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Murad Awawdeh
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Murad Awawdeh
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Murad Awawdeh
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NYIC

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Rovika Rajkishun
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Rovika Rajkishun
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Rovika Rajkishun
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Rovika Rajkishun
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Rovika Rajkishun
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Jonsar Studios

Read story here.

100. Michael Ryan

Executive Director, New York City Board of Elections

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Michael Ryan
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Michael Ryan
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Michael Ryan
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Michael Ryan
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Michael Ryan
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Matthew Rodriguez

New York City’s election year drama has been a comedy of errors. First the Board of Elections received a deluge of absentee ballots, then disqualified 84,000 of them and took six weeks to fully count two congressional races. They also mailed some ballot envelopes with the wrong name and address, opened too few early voting sites, and certified results a month late. Michael Ryan claims the BOE will be ready for the complexities of ranked-choice voting. Let’s hope so.

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