Public advocate rivals Williams, Ulrich top winners list

The public advocate's race dominated the week after Amazon, and no one knows exactly where upstate is. But you will know who was this week's biggest winner (and loser).

Update: Two candidates in the New York City public advocate race were voted the top winners last week, with City Councilman Jumaane Williams picking up the coveted New York Times endorsement and City Councilman Eric Ulrich getting the backing of the Daily News (and, after publication, the New York Post). Meanwhile, Trump ally Roger Stone was voted the biggest loser of the week after his latest dirty trick backfired. 

There’s only one debate more politically potent than City & State’s weekly Winners & Losers, and that’s the eternal question of “where is upstate?” U.S. Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart’s famous phrase that “I know it when I see it” may apply here, but newly elected Republican state Sen. Daphne Jordan from the Capital Region thought she could do better, introducing a surely doomed bill to study whether New York should be split in two. Who would win and lose in such a scenario? We’ll plead the Fifth.

WINNERS:

Peter Baynes -

Local governments scored a win when Gov. Andrew Cuomo (sort of) restored $60 million in Aid and Incentives for Municipalities funding, a.k.a. AIM. However, they’d like the Guv to aim a little higher. The return of this aid is contingent on a new online sales tax. For Baynes – executive director of the state Conference of Mayors – this means that the end of one budget fight has ignited another, because he says collecting more sales tax is just another mandate on local governments.

Joe Crowley -

Queens may not have wanted him last year, but D.C. isn’t tired of him yet. The former congressman announced that he’s joining the Washington law firm Squire Patton Boggs, along with former Republican Rep. Bill Shuster of Pennsylvania. The duo signed on with the influential firm whose clients include Coca-Cola and Procter & Gamble. Though Crowley is facing backlash from his fellow Democrats – Zephyr Teachout said he’s selling out 20 years of goodwill – this comeback kid’s going to get a fat paycheck on K Street.

@PlacardAbuse -

The prodigious Twitter account run by an anonymous cabal of good government crusaders has successfully raised the issue of parking placard corruption to the point where Mayor Bill de Blasio could no longer avoid it. No, the tweeters were not happy with de Blasio’s long-delayed and inadequate response to the scourge of bad parkers, but Thursday’s press conference was a testament to the power of righteously indignant Twitter cranks.

Max Rose -

Freshman congressman Max Rose has something to brag about: He got his wall before the president – a seawall, that is. The 5.3-mile Staten Island barrier, funded by $400 million from the federal government, will be a multi-purpose structure, acting as a dam during flooding, and as a recreational space, with bike paths, beach access and a boardwalk. First proposed in 2015, the project, which has been stalled due to bureaucratic red tape, is expected to save $30 million a year in flood-related damages. Build that wall!

Eric Ulrich & Jumaane Williams -

Running for public advocate as a Republican in New York City ain’t easy. But City Councilman Eric Ulrich is trying to capitalize on the crowded field in next week’s citywide special election, especially as the only leading candidate to fully support the failed – but popular – Amazon HQ2 deal. Ulrich also got endorsed by the Daily News – but then he was one-upped by fellow City Councilman Jumaane Williams, the frontrunner in the race who added the influential New York Times to his impressive list of endorsements.

LOSERS:

Patrick Lynch -

A New York appeals court ruled this week that the public has a right to see footage from police body cameras, delivering a blow to Patrick Lynch, president of the Police Benevolent Association, which sought to block the release of body cam footage. Arguably, though, it shouldn’t be all that surprising that technology intended to increase transparency and public accountability will be ultimately be made public.

Josh Meltzer -

Airbnb’s initial success in blocking a New York City disclosure law earlier this year was diminished on Sunday when Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a subpoena for info on 20,000 listings in the city, giving Airbnb and its head of public policy, Josh Meltzer, another headache to deal with. The subpoena is bad, but what may be worse is the sinking feeling that this back-and-forth regulatory fight with the city will never end.

Gary Pretlow & Latrice Walker -

The New York Association of Black and Puerto Rican Legislators was charging $225 a head and up to party on Caucus Weekend in Albany, but where that money will go remains a mystery. Assemblyman Gary Pretlow, the group’s treasurer, and Assemblywoman Latrice Walker, its chair, might have answers, but the best they have offered to reporters are no comment and a locked door. Attorney General Letitia James has issued a “notice of delinquency” over the nonprofit’s failure to file required reports the last few years, so at some point the party has got to end no matter who is having fun.

Roger Stone -

When the Trump whisperer was arrested last month, The New York Times drew a curious conclusion: Roger Stone’s Dirty Tricks Put Him Where He’s Always Wanted to Be: Center Stage. You’d think any sane person would rather not actually be indicted by Special Counsel Robert Mueller. But Stone lent credence to the notion when he went on to post an Instagram photo of the federal judge assigned to his case alongside a cross-hairs symbol – and while it made headlines, it didn’t seem to help. Crazy political genius or fiendish self-promoter whose past is catching up with him? We’ll have to wait and see.

Polly Trottenberg -

NYC settled with the federal government this week, admitting to making fraudulent claims to damages following Superstorm Sandy. The claims, filed by the Trottenberg’s Department of Transportation, sought FEMA funds for agency vehicles that were damaged during the storm. However, the agency included vehicles damaged before the storm hit. The city will reimburse the feds $5.3 million, a relatively small price given its multibillion-dollar budget.

X
This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
Accept Cookies
X
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

Allow All Cookies

Manage Consent Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

Save Settings
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Cookie List

A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

Strictly Necessary Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Functional Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Performance Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Social Media Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Targeting Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.