The Power of Diversity: Latino 100 (11 - 50)

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortes is #1 on City & State's Latino Power 100.
Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortes is #1 on City & State's Latino Power 100.
Andrew Harnick/AP/Shutterstock
Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortes is #1 on City & State's Latino Power 100.
Power 100

The Power of Diversity: Latino 100 (11 - 50)

Recognizing the most politically influential Latinos – who make New York what it is.

Thank you to our sponsor

[INSERT_SPONSORS_LOGO]

11. Henry Garrido

Executive Director, District Council 37

Henry Garrido’s tenure as executive director of the city’s largest municipal employees union has been marked by pay raises for its employees and a merger with DC 1707. Politicians constantly seek out Garrido’s endorsement, which recently went to Rep. Carolyn Maloney in her reelection bid for Congress, Assembly Member Michael Blake in his run for the 15th Congressional District seat, and Sandy Nurse in her run for New York City Council.

12. Ritchie Torres

New York City Council Member

2020 08 19_CSNY_RitchieTorres_DSC4224_FINAL.jpg

City Council Member and incoming Congressman Ritchie Torres.
Alt Text: 
City Council Member and incoming Congressman Ritchie Torres.
Title Text: 
City Council Member and incoming Congressman Ritchie Torres.
Description: 
City Council Member and incoming Congressman Ritchie Torres.
Image Credit: 
Guerin Blask

Supporters of New York City Council Member Ritchie Torres have always stressed the 32-year-old legislator is destined for great things, and those predictions came true after Torres secured the Democratic nomination for the 15th Congressional District seat in a race that pitted him against fellow progressives and the socially conservative Democrat and Council Member Rubén Díaz Sr. With his nomination virtually assuring him a victory in November, the presumptive winner is headed for the national stage.

RELATED: Ritchie Torres won't follow your script

13. Jessica Ramos

State Senator

RRamos3.jpg

Image Credit: 
Sean Pressley

State Sen. Jessica Ramos may have been in the chamber for just two years, but she’s already proven an aggressive advocate for state Senate Democrats’ most urgent progressive causes, including decriminalizing sex work and holding the line on bail reform. And she isn’t afraid to stand up to her old boss, Mayor Bill de Blasio, publicly disagreeing over a bill to increase the number of vendor permits following the controversial arrest of the “Churro Lady.” Ramos is up for reelection, and her increasing clout can serve as a guarantee for another term.

14. Vincent Alvarez

President, New York City Central Labor Council

Vincent Alvarez - Submitted.jpeg

President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
Alt Text: 
President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
Title Text: 
President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
Caption: 
President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
Description: 
President of the New York City Central Labor Council Vincent Alvarez
Image Credit: 
Submitted

The spine of the city’s labor force – comprised of teachers, truckers, electricians, firefighters – has a fighter in Vincent Alvarez, who’s rolled up his sleeves as president of the New York City Central Labor Council. In times of crisis – be it last year’s possible strike by MTA employees or this year’s coronavirus impacting millions – Alvarez has been on hand to lend his voice to 1.3 million members in the umbrella group.

15. Marisa Lago

Chair, New York City Planning Commission

Marisa Lago - Edwin J. Torres_Mayoral Photography Office.jpg

Marisa Lago
Alt Text: 
Marisa Lago
Title Text: 
Marisa Lago
Caption: 
Marisa Lago
Description: 
Marisa Lago
Image Credit: 
Edwin J. Torres/Mayoral Photography Office

As chair of the City Planning Commission, Marisa Lago has a front row seat to the changing New York City skyline and the uptick in resentment that goes with it. Among the notable decisions she’s had to preside over was the approval of the closing of Rikers Island in favor of smaller jails. It was with plenty of resistance from both sides of the argument—those believing Rikers can be saved through renovations and the “No New Jails” activists. Next on her list: realizing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s expanded plan for more affordable housing.

16. Luis Sepúlveda

State Senator

State Sen. Luis Sepúlveda secured one of his biggest victories last year with the passage of the Green Light Bill, clearing a path for undocumented immigrants to obtain state-issued driver’s licenses. The measure was opposed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which suspended the Trusted Traveler Program at New York airports once the law went into effect. The Bronx lawmaker in the past mulled a run for district attorney. 

17. Carlina Rivera

New York City Council Member

2020 03 03_CSNY_CarlinaRivera_25482_SOCIAL.jpg

New York City Councilwoman Carlina Rivera, one of City & State's 2020 Above & Beyond.
Alt Text: 
New York City Councilwoman Carlina Rivera, one of City & State's 2020 Above & Beyond.
Title Text: 
New York City Councilwoman Carlina Rivera, one of City & State's 2020 Above & Beyond.
Caption: 
New York City Councilwoman Carlina Rivera, one of City & State's 2020 Above & Beyond.
Description: 
New York City Councilwoman Carlina Rivera, one of City & State's 2020 Above & Beyond.
Image Credit: 
Guerin Blask

New York City Council Member Carlina Rivera may have been in the chamber only since 2017, but she’s already a front-runner to replace Corey Johnson as the next council speaker. Introducing a bill that required Airbnb to disclose host data in New York City and co-chairing the Women’s Caucus have raised her profile. Should 2021 prove prosperous for the hospitals committee chair, it could propel her to the speaker post.

18. Antonio Reynoso

New York City Council Member

reynoso-johnson-John-McCarten-nyc-council.jpg

New York City Councilman Antonio Reynoso and New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson.
Alt Text: 
New York City Councilman Antonio Reynoso and New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson.
Title Text: 
New York City Councilman Antonio Reynoso and New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson.
Caption: 
New York City Councilman Antonio Reynoso and New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson.
Description: 
New York City Councilman Antonio Reynoso and New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson.
Image Credit: 
John McCarten for the New York City Council

Antonio Reynoso has led successful reforms to New York City’s commercial waste industry as chair of the Sanitation Committee, introducing legislation that established greater city control over an unregulated and often unsafe industry. The Brooklyn lawmaker has been ramping up for a run for borough president – he’s got plans for his home borough and will likely give other candidates a run for their money.

19. Antonio Delgado

Congress Member

Antonio-Delgado---Delgado-For-Congress.jpg

Antonio Delgado
Alt Text: 
Antonio Delgado
Title Text: 
Antonio Delgado
Description: 
Antonio Delgado
Image Credit: 
Delgado For Congress

Harvard Law School-educated freshman Congressman Antonio Delgado managed to flip the 19th Congressional District seat from red to blue in 2018, helping Democrats regain the majority in the House of Representatives. Delgado hopes to repeat his victory in November by focusing on quality-of-life issues like the removal of PFAS contaminants in drinking water and greater broadband access to Otsego and Delaware Counties, which he represents. 

20. Gustavo Rivera

State Senator

You won’t find a stronger advocate for single-payer health care than state Sen. Gustavo Rivera – and he’s got the pulpit to amplify the fight. As chair of the state Senate health committee and main sponsor of the New York Health Act introduced in 2017, the staunch Democrat has prioritized overhauling the system. With COVID-19 wreaking havoc across the nation, Rivera has found his strongest argument yet for such an overhaul.

21. Julia Salazar

State Senator

Julia-Salazar_celeste-sloman-2.jpg

Julia Salazar
Alt Text: 
Julia Salazar
Title Text: 
Julia Salazar
Description: 
Julia Salazar
Image Credit: 
Celeste Sloman

She may be a freshman legislator, but state Sen. Julia Salazar has had little trouble getting items on her legislative wish list addressed and even enacted, including an aggressive revamp on state rent laws. The Democratic Socialist representing Brooklyn may have notched a few victories, but she’ll be the first to tell you the work isn’t over on hot-button issues like tenant protection measures.

22. Carlos Menchaca

New York City Council Member

Menchaca-nyc-council-flickr.jpg

New York City Councilman Carlos Menchaca.
Alt Text: 
New York City Councilman Carlos Menchaca.
Title Text: 
New York City Councilman Carlos Menchaca.
Caption: 
New York City Councilman Carlos Menchaca.
Description: 
New York City Councilman Carlos Menchaca.
Image Credit: 
New York City Council

Carlos Menchaca, the first Mexican-American elected to the New York City Council, has focused on immigration during his six years in office, authoring the IDNYC program and introducing bills limiting immigration agents from infiltrating the courts as well as a resolution mandating that they identify themselves. Yet lately the biggest headlines have come from his controversial decision to side with local activists in blocking the Industry City rezoning.

23. Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez

Commissioner, New York City Department for the Aging

2019 12 24_CSNY_Lorraine_Cortes_Vasquez_47996_FINAL.jpg

Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez
Alt Text: 
Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez
Title Text: 
Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez
Caption: 
Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez
Description: 
Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez
Image Credit: 
Guerin Blask

With more older denizens calling New York City home, it’s clear Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez’s role as commissioner for the New York City Department for the Aging – which seeks to make the five boroughs more age friendly – will be even more relevant in the years ahead. Another sign of her growing importance: Mayor Bill de Blasio appointed her to the MTA board this year.

24. Nicole Malliotakis

Assembly Member

Malliotakis.jpg

Nicole Malliotakis
Alt Text: 
Nicole Malliotakis
Title Text: 
Nicole Malliotakis

The New York Times called Assembly Member Nicole Malliotakis a lawmaker with “guts” during her 2017 Republican New York City mayoral run, a campaign in which she highlighted her Cuban heritage. The only GOP woman representing a portion of the five boroughs – sections of Staten Island and Brooklyn – is now challenging Rep. Max Rose, and has proven to be relentless, attacking her rival like a prizefighter.

25. Ruben Diaz Jr. 

Bronx Borough President 

0103_CityAndState_Ruben_Diaz_Jr_0456E.jpg

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.
Alt Text: 
Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.
Title Text: 
Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.
Caption: 
Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.
Description: 
Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.
Image Credit: 
Philip Vukelich

For years, Ruben Diaz Jr. was seen as the best shot to become the first Latino mayor of New York City, thanks to his political talents, his experience in elected office and such influential allies as Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie. But earlier this year, the Bronx borough president surprised New York’s political world with his decision to drop out of the 2021 race. 

26. Javier H. Valdés

Co-executive Director, Make the Road New York

Whether it’s blasting U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement for its aggressive arrests of undocumented immigrants or calling out Gov. Andrew Cuomo for not acknowledging the 13-year nonprofit advocacy group, Javier Valdés will make sure you know his opinion. As executive director for Make the Road New York, Valdés works to ensure undocumented immigrants have a path carved out for them as they seek out the American dream.

27. Maritza Davila

Assembly Member

maritza-davila-ny-assembly.jpg

Maritza Davila
Alt Text: 
Maritza Davila
Title Text: 
Maritza Davila
Caption: 
Maritza Davila will now lead the state Assembly's Puerto Rican/Hispanic Task Force.
Description: 
Maritza Davila
Image Credit: 
Photo courtesy New York Assembly

Prioritizing issues that impact New York’s Latino community as a way of hammering out policy positions has been crucial for the Brooklyn Assembly member Maritza Davila, who has doubled as the chair of the ever-popular Somos El Futuro conference since 2018, corralling lawmakers for policy brainstorming and schmoozing. Davila also hasn’t forgotten about her gentrifying district, calling out shady landlords in Brooklyn and addressing the issue of domestic violence.

28. Fernando Cabrera

New York City Council Member

Fernando Cabrera.jpg

Bronx City Councilman Fernando Cabrera earned activists’ ire for praising the Ugandan government’s internationally condemned anti-LGBT laws.
Alt Text: 
Bronx City Councilman Fernando Cabrera earned activists’ ire for praising the Ugandan government’s internationally condemned anti-LGBT laws.
Title Text: 
Bronx City Councilman Fernando Cabrera earned activists’ ire for praising the Ugandan government’s internationally condemned anti-LGBT laws.
Caption: 
Bronx City Councilman Fernando Cabrera (center)
Description: 
Bronx City Councilman Fernando Cabrera earned activists’ ire for praising the Ugandan government’s internationally condemned anti-LGBT laws.
Image Credit: 
William Alatriste/New York City Council

New York City Council Member Fernando Cabrera is among the longest-serving council members in the Bronx and is part of a group of socially conservative Democrats in council chambers. During his decade in the council, Cabrera has risen to the post of majority whip, seeing more than 30 of his bills passed. The ordained pastor is jumping into what should be a hotly contested borough president race in the Bronx.

29. Sonia Ossorio

President, National Organization for Women New York City

Sonia Ossorio - Lynn Savarese.png

Image Credit: 
Lynn Savarese

Since 2005, Sonia Ossorio has been at the helm of NOW New York, amplifying the concerns of women across the state while boosting the fortunes of female politicians who went on to win public office. With a membership base of 20,000 behind her, Ossorio has led campaigns that blasted the NYPD for inadequately revamping the Special Victims Unit, and that took aim at the MTA for a controversial ad campaign that appeared to promote a sex work pop-up exhibit.

30. Havidán Rodríguez

President, University at Albany

Havidan Rodriguez - submitted.jpeg

Havidan Rodriguez
Alt Text: 
Havidan Rodriguez
Title Text: 
Havidan Rodriguez
Caption: 
Havidan Rodriguez
Description: 
Havidan Rodriguez
Image Credit: 
Submitted

With a record of expanding higher learning institutions, Havidán Rodríguez’s tenure as president of the University at Albany has included some lofty plans, including a new $180 million academic center that will be the home of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity, and the Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences. Rodríguez was previously the founding provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley.

31. Ana Oliveira

President and CEO, New York Women’s Foundation

Advancing women and taking on their challenges has been Ana Oliveira’s life’s work. As president of the New York Women’s Foundation, the native of Brazil leads a group that has seen its membership jump elevenfold since she began leading it in 2006. Her insight into helping the disadvantaged has earned her a spot on the New York City Commission on Human Rights as a commissioner, and seats on the Independent Commission to Study Criminal Justice Reform in New York City and the board of Philanthropy New York.

32. Ydanis Rodriguez

New York City Council Member

ydanisrodriguez.jpg

City Council member Ydanis Rodriguez, sponsor of the bill that will allow non-citizens to vote in NYC's municipal elections.
Alt Text: 
City Council member Ydanis Rodriguez, sponsor of the bill that will allow non-citizens to vote in NYC's municipal elections.
Title Text: 
City Council member Ydanis Rodriguez, sponsor of the bill that will allow non-citizens to vote in NYC's municipal elections.
Caption: 
City Council member Ydanis Rodriguez, sponsor of the bill that will allow non-citizens to vote in NYC's municipal elections.
Description: 
City Council member Ydanis Rodriguez, sponsor of the bill that will allow non-citizens to vote in NYC's municipal elections.
Image Credit: 
William Alatriste for the New York City Council

New York City Council Member Ydanis Rodriguez might have been a long shot in his unsuccessful bid to win the 15th Congressional District Democratic primary, but he’s been making strides in the City Council, building his resume as chair of the transportation committee. He has backed a proposal to bail out cash-strapped cabbies, a bill to strip reckless drivers of their vehicles and moved to authorize greater oversight of the multibillion-dollar LaGuardia Airport AirTrain expansion project.

33. Diana Ayala

New York City Council Member

Diana Ayala made the toughest choice of her career, compounded by blowback she received from some Bronx City Council colleagues, when she voted to close Rikers Island. But the former chief of staff to her predecessor, Melissa Mark-Viverito, carried out a promise from her former boss in seeing it through. The Bronx and Manhattan lawmaker has been a prolific legislator, drafting 18 bills, with seven of them passing.

34. Francisco Moya

New York City Council Member

Francisco Moya - Michael Nigro.jpeg

Image Credit: 
Michael Nigro

New York City Council Member Francisco Moya has taken a bite out of food delivery service app goliaths that have gouged New York City’s restaurant industry through a bill introduced earlier this year. The ambitious Queens lawmaker with a propensity for helping the downtrodden now has his sights set on helping airline workers who are facing layoffs as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

35. Jorge Ramos

Anchor, “Noticiero Univision”

Whether he’s documenting a ravaged Puerto Rico following natural disasters, confronting President Donald Trump, or being detained for asking Venezuelan dictator Nicolás Maduro tough questions on conditions in the country, there’s nothing that keeps Jorge Ramos from reporting what’s happening to millions of Latinos. The eight-time Emmy-winning anchor has been a journalist for 40 years, and has been called “the Walter Cronkite of Latin America.”

36. Anthony Romero

Executive Director, American Civil Liberties Union

One of the most consistent thorns in President Trump’s side has been Anthony Romero, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union. At the helm of the national nonprofit for nearly 20 years, Romero has waged legal battles against the Bush administration’s spying program, the Obama administration’s drone strike program and the Trump administration’s insistence on keeping prisoners detained during the pandemic.

37. José E. Serrano

Congress Member

jose_serrano-lev_radin_shutterstock.jpg

Rep. Jose Serrano
Rep. Jose Serrano
lev radin/Shutterstock

Rep. José Serrano’s career, which has spanned five presidencies, 9/11, the Great Recession, and a changing political atmosphere, ends this year in the same district he’s represented for nearly a generation. The South Bronx legislator – the most senior Hispanic elected official and longest-serving Puerto Rican congressman – caps more than 45 years as an elected official, beginning with a 15-year run in the Assembly. The Bronx of 1990 is certainly not the same as the Bronx of 2020 thanks to Serrano’s fight to secure federal dollars to clean up the Bronx River, create more affordable housing and repair dormant sections of the Bronx. 

38. Luis Miranda & Roberto Ramírez

Founders, MirRam Group

robert ramirez-luis miranda-landa towns-john james.png

Robert Ramirez (left) and Luis Miranda (right)
Alt Text: 
Robert Ramirez (left) and Luis Miranda (right)
Title Text: 
Robert Ramirez (left) and Luis Miranda (right)
Caption: 
Robert Ramirez (left) and Luis Miranda (right)
Description: 
Robert Ramirez (left) and Luis Miranda (right)
Image Credit: 
Landa Towns; John James

The political consulting duo remains a fixture in New York City politics, with Roberto Ramírez once serving as Bronx Democratic Party boss and Luis Miranda serving on the campaigns of Charles Schumer, Kirsten Gillibrand, and Hillary Clinton in their respective runs for U.S. Senate. On top of creating another consulting firm, the Hamilton Campaign Network, the pair has also created the Manhattan Times and Bronx Free Press.

39. Frankie Miranda

President and CEO, Hispanic Federation

Frankie Miranda rose to president and CEO of the Hispanic Federation after proving his mettle in various capacities within the organization, including senior vice president and executive vice president. He helped expand the Hispanic Federation’s footprint by opening field offices in Florida and Puerto Rico, throwing the weight of the 30-year-old nonprofit behind recent recovery efforts there.

40. Rossana Rosado

New York Secretary of State

SOS Rosado HeadShot.jpg

Rossana Rosado
Alt Text: 
Rossana Rosado
Title Text: 
Rossana Rosado
Caption: 
Rossana Rosado
Description: 
Rossana Rosado
Image Credit: 
Office of the New York Secretary of State

Confirmed as Secretary to the New York State Department of State in 2016, Rosanna Rosado has overseen major initiatives, including the legalization of professional mixed martial arts and greater services to the immigrant population. Born and raised in the Bronx, Rosado also served as publisher and editor of the influential El Diario La Prensa publication, and is a winner of Peabody and Emmy awards.

41. Monica Martinez

State Senator

Monica-Martinez-Monica-Martinez-for-State-Senate.jpg

Monica Martinez.
Alt Text: 
Monica Martinez.
Title Text: 
Monica Martinez.
Caption: 
Monica Martinez.
Description: 
Monica Martinez.
Image Credit: 
Monica Martinez for State-Senate

She may be pegged as a progressive Democrat, but state Sen. Monica Martinez has become quite the swing voter, thanks to her affiliation with the “Long Island Six,” a moderate group inspired by the bygone Independent Democratic Conference. The Brentwood, Long Island, native has sided with Republicans on bills ranging from allowing undocumented immigrants to obtain state-issued driver’s licenses to rent reform. Facing reelection this year, Martinez has introduced a bill that amends bail reform.

42. Peter Lopez

Regional Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency Region 2

peter-lopez-epa.jpg

Peter Lopez.
Alt Text: 
Peter Lopez.
Title Text: 
Peter Lopez.
Caption: 
Peter Lopez.
Description: 
Peter Lopez.
Image Credit: 
Environmental Protection Agency

Peter Lopez is juggling a number of environmental hazards of critical importance as regional administrator to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Region 2, which covers New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and several tribal regions. That includes mandating a massive cleanup job of the Hudson River by General Electric, and announcing an action plan to address the handling of PFAS contaminants found in drinking water. 

43. Tonio Burgos

Founder and CEO, Tonio Burgos & Associates

Tonio Burgos - TBA.png

Image Credit: 
TBA

Tonio Burgos has navigated the lobbying world thanks in no small part to his knowledge of Albany politics that began when he was a top aide to Gov. Mario Cuomo. His relationship with the Cuomos has continued; he donated $85,000 to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s campaign. Cuomo later appointed Burgos to the Hurricane Maria Memorial Commission, which unveiled a memorial for victims of the catastrophic natural disaster.

44. Fernando Ferrer

Co-chair, Mercury

fernando-ferrer-mta.jpg

Fernando Ferrer
Alt Text: 
Fernando Ferrer
Title Text: 
Fernando Ferrer
Description: 
Fernando Ferrer
Image Credit: 
Photo courtesy MTA

Life after public office has worked out well for Fernando “Freddy” Ferrer, co-chair of Mercury, the global public strategy firm with past clients that include WeWork, Charter Communications, and American Transit Company. In addition to his position at Mercury, the former Bronx Borough President and two-time mayoral candidate serves on the MTA board, even once filling in as acting chair, and is recognized as a leader in revamping cities.

45. Catalina Cruz

Assembly Member

catalina-cruz-assembly.jpg

Catalina Cruz
Alt Text: 
Catalina Cruz
Title Text: 
Catalina Cruz
Caption: 
Catalina Cruz
Description: 
Catalina Cruz
Image Credit: 
Courtesy New York Assembly

When Assembly Member Catalina Cruz makes her way to a microphone, people listen – and the results can be viral. The first Dreamer elected to the Legislature, Cruz advocates for undocumented immigrants on issues like the Green Light Law, which allows undocumented immigrants to obtain driver’s licenses. Cruz now has her sights on fulfilling a promise by Queens borough president candidate Donovan Richards to create an immigrant welcome center in her home borough.

46. Nick Sifuentes

Executive Director, Tri-State Transportation Campaign

Nick-Sifuentes_celeste-sloman.jpg

Nick Sifuentes
Alt Text: 
Nick Sifuentes
Title Text: 
Nick Sifuentes
Description: 
Nick Sifuentes
Image Credit: 
Celeste Sloman

The vision of an equitable and fairer transportation network drives Nick Sifuentes, executive director of Tri-State Transportation Campaign. Since taking the helm, Sifuentes has highlighted the need to roll out the Fair Fares initiative, advocated for e-bike laws, and called for the MTA board to have its vacant spot occupied by a member with a physical disability. Sifuentes is continuing the work he began at Riders Alliance, where he served as deputy director. 

47. Karines Reyes

Assembly Member

KARINESS_REYES_celeste-sloman.jpg

Karines Reyes
Alt Text: 
Karines Reyes
Title Text: 
Karines Reyes
Caption: 
Karines Reyes
Description: 
Karines Reyes
Image Credit: 
Celeste Sloman

Karines Reyes spends half the year in the Assembly chambers and the other half at Montefiore Einstein Hospital in the Bronx as a registered nurse. It’s the perfect mix for Reyes, who has advocated for better nurse-to-patient ratios and single-payer health care, both in the Assembly and as a member of the New York State Nurses Association. There’s now talk that Reyes could replace Assembly Member Marcos Crespo as Bronx Democratic Party boss.

48. Victor Pichardo

Assembly Member

This could be the year for the four-term Assembly member: a growing Dominican population in the Bronx could help him become the borough’s first Dominican Democratic Party boss. But even if he doesn’t secure the spot, Victor Pichardo will still be a busy man, reigniting the debate on legalizing recreational marijuana while defending bail reform, two pieces of legislation that have a direct impact in the 86th Assembly District.

49. Cesar Perales

Vice Chair, SUNY Board of Trustees

With a career that spans four decades, including a stint as assistant secretary for health, education and welfare under President Jimmy Carter, Cesar Perales brings a wealth of experience from all levels of government to his role as a trustee to the SUNY board, where he has helped shepherd a task force aimed at creating a more inclusive campus experience across the network’s 64 higher learning institutions and campuses. Perales’ resume also includes stints as New York state commissioner of social services under Gov. Mario Cuomo and a member of the board of directors of Empire State Development, New York state's economic development agency.

50. Israel Rocha Jr.

CEO, NYC Health + Hospitals/Elmhurst and Queens

Israel Rocha - submitted.jpeg

Israel Rocha
Alt Text: 
Israel Rocha
Image Credit: 
Submitted

As CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals/Elmhurst, the public hospital at the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, Israel Rocha Jr. has increased patient revenue by $50 million per year, secured funds to build a new emergency room, a neurosciences center, and an ambulatory surgical center, and has renovated various departments at the hospital. He previously worked for the U.S. House of Representatives in Texas’ 15th Congressional District.

Corrections: State Sen. Jessica Ramos advocates for decriminalizing sex work; her efforts were misstated in an earlier version of this story. New York City Central Labor Council President Vincent Alvarez's title was originally stated incorrectly in the body of his profile. Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez's profile previously incorrectly stated the status of her nomination to the MTA board, which was approved earlier this summer.

Placeholder blue outline avatar
City & State
20200924