MTA to enforce bus lane violations on 14th Street

M14 MTA bus.
M14 MTA bus.
DW labs Incorporated/Shutterstock
M14 MTA bus.

MTA to enforce bus lane violations on 14th Street

Tickets will be given to vehicles caught driving in the bus lane.
January 21, 2020

One of New York City’s newest and most controversial transit initiatives – the 14th Street Busway – launched more than three months ago, but starting today, riders may get to see the full effect of bus prioritization on 14th street as the MTA begins to enforce fines for bus lane violations caught on its mounted camera system. 

Late last year, the MTA implemented its forward-facing bus-mounted cameras on the M14A/D SBS buses that travel along 14th Street, but held off on enforcing fines for cars that drive or park in the bus lanes. Now, after a 60-day grace period, motorists will face increasing fines – $50 for the first offense, plus $50 for each subsequent offense in a 12-month period, up to $250 – for blocking the bus lane. Fines are already being enforced on other routes where the MTA’s bus-mounted camera systems are in effect – the M15 and B44 routes. During a similar 60-day warning period for the M15 route, more than 15,000 violations were recorded

The MTA’s Automated Bus Lane Enforcement – also known as ABLE – uses evidence including license plate information, photos and timestamps to document bus lane violations, and also works in concert with cameras used by the city Department of Transportation.

“We know it’s working because buses are faster and more customers come back to the bus system where these improvements have been implemented,” Craig Cipriano, acting MTA Bus Company president and senior vice president for buses of NYC Transit, said of bus prioritization in a press release on Monday. “We are changing everything that New Yorkers thought they knew about our buses, from new zero emission all-electric buses to more customer amenities and better service.”

For the rest of today's tech news, head over to First Read Tech.

Annie McDonough
Annie McDonough
is a tech and policy reporter at City & State.
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