2022 general election

2022 general election: Who’s running for Congress in New York

Looking at every House race in the Empire State, which could be key to which party controls Congress.

14th Congressional District Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

14th Congressional District Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Drew Angerer/Getty Images

All eyes are on New York state when it comes to control of the House of Representatives, with as many as 10 competitive races out of the state’s 26 seats. And with Democrats holding a slim, eight-vote majority this session, every election could count.

But even the most attention-hungry New York Democrats might not be happy about the state’s turn in the spotlight (here’s looking at you, Sean Patrick Maloney). Congressional district maps passed into law by New York’s Democratic Legislature and governor were gerrymandered to help Democrats and hurt Republicans. Long story short, the maps got tossed by the courts, and the new district lines prioritized competitiveness – which was good news for conservatives. The opposition party usually sees major gains in the first midterm election of a president’s tenure.

That redistricting process, tied to the 2020 census, left the state with 26 seats, down from 27, and placed a lot of New Yorkers in substantially redrawn districts.

Anyone can see the lines, and how they changed, on the CUNY Graduate Center’s Redistricting & You site, a partnership with the Center for Urban Research. More information about the maps, 2020 presidential results and racial demographics can also be found on Dave’s Redistricting, which the court-appointed special master, Jonathan Cervas, used to submit the final maps.

City & State looked at every district in the state to preview the general election. And if you want to relive the August primaries, that page can be found here. This information is updated as of Oct. 21.

1st Congressional District

Eastern parts of Suffolk County
From left to right: Bridget Fleming (D, WFP), Nick LaLota (R, C) / Jared Siskin/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images; Nick LaLota for Congress

Current member: Lee Zeldin (R), who is running for governor

2020 presidential results: Biden +0.2

Demographics: 72% white, 16% Hispanic, 5% Asian, 4% Black

2020 general election results: Zeldin (R, C, I): 55%, Goroff (D, WFP): 45%

2022 candidates: Bridget Fleming (D, WFP), Nick LaLota (R, C)

What’s happening: Suffolk County Legislature Chief of Staff Nick LaLota was the party establishment’s pick in the Republican primary. He got 47% in the three-way race so he’s got some ground to make up on a Democrat he must know well from his government job: Suffolk County Legislator Bridget Fleming, who was able to avoid a primary. But don’t be fooled by Biden’s narrow advantage here – this is a Republican-leaning district, with the county GOP fully expecting to hold on to the seat despite Rep. Lee Zeldin leaving office to run for governor. In fact, his coattails could carry LaLota, a Navy veteran who was a 2016 Republican National Convention delegate for Donald Trump, to victory. While the candidates are predictably far apart on abortion, policing has become a hot topic. LaLota’s side has criticized Fleming for saying racial injustice was widespread in government and law enforcement. Fleming’s side has attacked LaLota for pitching the idea of cutting police funding when he served on the Amityville village board. Fleming, a former ​​Manhattan prosecutor, might have earned a surprising endorsement from the county’s police union because of her former role. Most prognosticators rate the seat as leaning Republican.

2nd Congressional District

Southern parts of Suffolk and Nassau counties
From left to right: Garbarino (R, C), Jackie Gordon (D, WFP) / Provided; Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for One Fair Wage

Current member: Andrew Garbarino (R)

2020 presidential results: Trump +1.6

Demographics: 56% white, 28% Hispanic, 10% Black, 3% Asian

2020 general election results: Garbarino (R, C, L, SAM): 53%, Jackie Gordon (D, WFP, I): 46%, Harry Burger (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Garbarino (R, C), Jackie Gordon (D, WFP)

What’s happening: It’s a rare 2020 rematch. But the seat is no longer open – Rep. Andrew Garbarino has two years under his belt and a reputation as a moderate Republican. The incumbent has greatly outraised and outspent Jackie Gordon, an Army veteran and school guidance counselor, and the Democrat isn’t getting much if any outside help from super PACs, which have largely written off the race. Still, anything could happen if voters are moved by her appeals on abortion rights and gun control over Garbarino’s talk of inflation and crime. Most House raters consider this one as likely Republican, or at least leaning Republican.

3rd Congressional District

Northern parts of Nassau County and Queens
From left to right: George Santos (R, C), Robert Zimmerman (D, WFP) / Made for You Media; Gerri Hernandez

Current member: Tom Suozzi (D), who unsuccessfully challenged Gov. Kathy Hochul in the Democratic primary and is not running for reelection

2020 presidential results: Biden +8.2

Demographics: 56% white, 23% Asian, 14% Hispanic, 3% Black

2020 general election results: Suozzi (D, WFP, I): 56%, George Santos (R, C): 43%, Howard Rabin (L): 1%

2022 candidates: George Santos (R, C), Robert Zimmerman (D, WFP)

What’s happening: Public relations maven Robert Zimmerman pulled off a big win in the crowded Democratic primary as the party establishment’s choice, thanks in part to his decades of support for the Democratic National Committee. While investment banker George Santos is a MAGA loyalist who once said he paid for legal support for Jan. 6 rioters. He’s a hardliner on abortion, and those views may be enough to sink him in the wealthy, suburban district – even as he tries to focus his campaign on crime and inflation. But in a potential wave year for Republicans, Santos has a much better shot than he did in 2020, when he ran against then-incumbent Rep. Tom Suozzi. Zimmerman and Santos’ fundraising is almost even, though the Democrat has attracted some outside super PAC support, primarily from 1199SEIU. Both candidates are out gay, which may be the first time that’s happened in a race for the House.

4th Congressional District

Southern parts of Nassau County
From left to right: Anthony D’Esposito (R, C), Laura Gillen (D) / Provided; Laura Gillen for Congress

Current member: Kathleen Rice (D), who is not running for reelection

2020 presidential results: Biden +14.6

Demographics: 51% white, 22% Hispanic, 16% Black, 7% Asian

2020 general election results: Rice (D): 56%, Douglas Tuman (R, C): 43%, Joseph Naham (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Anthony D’Esposito (R, C), Laura Gillen (D)

What’s happening: Long Island’s House seats are turning over, and Rep. Kathleen Rice is retiring from Congress too. This should be a safe Democratic district – a Republican hasn’t won this South Shore seat since 1996 – but Republican Anthony D’Esposito has some party faithful feeling hopeful, especially following conservatives’ wins in recent races for county executive, district attorney and more. Democrat Laura Gillen was a casualty there, losing her reelection bid for Hempstead supervisor in 2019. Both candidates are about even in fundraising, and neither are getting outside support in the general – after a super PAC funded by the cryptocurrency industry focused on pandemic preparedness spent $250,000 backing Gillen in her Democratic primary win.

5th Congressional District

Southeast Queens

Current member: Greg Meeks (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +62.8

Demographics: 40% Black, 21% Hispanic, 15% Asian, 13% white 

2020 general election results: Meeks uncontested

2022 candidates: Meeks (D), Paul King (R, C)

What’s happening: Rep. Greg Meeks was easily reelected as Queens Democratic County leader this year, and he’ll almost certainly be reelected to Congress against management consultant Paul King. A big question for Meeks will be whether his party can hold onto the majority, which would likely allow the 25-year congressional veteran to hold on to his powerful role chairing the House Foreign Relations Committee.

6th Congressional District

Central and northeastern Queens

Current member: Grace Meng (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +30.6

Demographics: 45% Asian, 24% white, 24% Hispanic, 4% Black

2020 general election results: Meng (D, WFP): 68%, Thomas Zmich (R, L, C, Save Our City): 32%

2022 candidates: Meng (D), Zmich (R, C, Medical Freedom)

What’s happening: Rep. Grace Meng appears to be sailing to reelection in her bid for a sixth term. She avoided a primary, and in the general will face Thomas Zmich, an Army Reserve veteran and building tradesperson, in a 2020 rematch. The 6th Congressional District has the highest percentage of Asian Americans in New York City, and Meng is New York’s first Asian American member of Congress. She has been a prominent figure in combating anti-Asian hate crimes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Her district remained relatively unchanged during the redistricting process. Meng has $919,000 in cash on hand, as of late September, while Zmich has just $450.

7th Congressional District

Southwestern Queens and North Brooklyn

Current member: Nydia Velázquez (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +63.2

Demographics: 36% white, 35% Hispanic, 13% Asian, 10% Black 

2020 general election results: Velázquez (D, WFP): 85%, Brian Kelly (R, C): 14%, Gilbert Midonnet (L): 1%

2022 candidates: Velázquez (D, WFP), Juan Pagán (R, C) 

What’s happening: Rep. Nydia Velázquez has served in Congress since 1993 and has cultivated an image as a progressive stalwart. The redrawn 7th Congressional District is substantially different from the district she currently represents, which includes Sunset Park, Red Hook and the Lower East Side. But the new one contains enough of her old constituents, as well as new, progressive-leaning constituents in Greenpoint who would like Velázquez to secure her seat. After the devastation from Hurricane Fiona, Velázquez has advocated for more support for Puerto Rico. Republican Juan Pagán will be on the ballot, but he hasn’t reported any fundraising.

8th Congressional District

Southern and Central Brooklyn

Current member: Hakeem Jeffries (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +53.6

Demographics: 42% Black, 28% white, 17% Hispanic, 9% Asian

2020 general election results: Jeffries (D, WFP): 85%, Garfield Wallace (R, C): 15%

2022 candidates: Jeffries (D), Yuri Dashevsky (R, C)

What’s happening: A former corporate attorney and Assembly member, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries has risen quickly in Congress and is now chair of the House Democratic Caucus, plus he’s a presumed front-runner to succeed Nancy Pelosi as Democratic leader after she retires. Despite his high profile, the Brooklynite has remained active in local politics. Last year, he stifled the campaign of a leading DSA New York City Council candidate and left out Yuh-Line Niou when discussing the 10th Congressional District primary race this year. Those are just a couple examples of Jeffries’ ire for the left, but the particulars of his district mean he isn’t vulnerable to a progressive challenge. Republican Yuri Dashevsky is a Jewish immigrant from the former Soviet Union as well as a documentary filmmaker and language interpreter. He has about $6,500 on hand compared to Jeffries’ $2.8 million as of late September.

9th Congressional District

Central Brooklyn

Current member: Yvette Clarke (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +51.8

Demographics: 40% Black, 32% white, 11% Hispanic, 9% Asian

2020 general election results: Clarke (D, WFP): 83%, Constantine Jean-Pierre (R, C): 16%, Gary Popkin (L): 1%

2022 candidates: Clarke (D, WFP), Menachem Raitport (C)

What’s happening: Eight-term Rep. Yvette Clarke is running for reelection in a Brooklyn district that encompasses Crown Heights, Brownsville and Midwood. Clarke has deep ties to the Brooklyn political class – her mother was the first Caribbean-born member of the New York City Council – and she’s served in Congress since 2007. Clarke got a scare in the 2018 Democratic primary when progressive newcomer Adem Bunkeddeko came within 6 points of beating her. But Clarke left little to chance in the 2020 primary when Bunkeddeko challenged her again, running aggressively and winning a four-way primary with 54% of the vote. After redistricting, her electoral terrain became even friendlier. The Park Slope neighborhoods that helped power Bunkeddeko’s impressive 2018 showing were drawn out of the district, and she didn’t have a primary challenger. She will face Menachem Raitport, a perennial candidate and Lubavitcher entrepreneur, on the Conservative Party line.

10th Congressional District

Lower Manhattan and western Brooklyn

Current member: Jerry Nadler (D), who is running in the 12th District

2020 presidential results: Biden +72

Demographics: 49% white, 22% Asian, 19% Hispanic, 6% Black

2020 general election results: Nadler (D, WFP): 75%, Cathy Bernstein (R, C): 24%, Michael Madrid (L): 1%

2022 candidates: Daniel Goldman (D), Benine Hamdan (R, C), Steve Speer (Medical Freedom)

What’s happening: All the action in this substantially redrawn district already happened in the Democratic primary, where Dan Goldman, former counsel to the House Democrats during the first Trump impeachment, won in a crowded field featuring, among others, Rep. Mondaire Jones, City Council Member Carlina Rivera, Assembly Member Yuh-Line Niou and even briefly former Mayor Bill de Blasio. After a narrow loss, Niou seriously considered opposing Goldman on the Working Families Party line in the general election, but ultimately decided against it, leaving Goldman with an easy path to victory in the overwhelmingly Democratic district. Goldman largely self-funded in the primary, giving himself $5 million and raising another $2 million from donors. Investment firm partner Benine Hamdan has raised just $25,000 total, and third party candidate Steve Speer has not reported any fundraising.

11th Congressional District

Staten Island, southwestern Brooklyn
From left to right: Nicole Malliotakis (R, C), Max Rose (D) / U.S. House; Eric Connolly/U.S. House Office of Photography

Current member: Nicole Malliotakis (R)

2020 presidential results: Trump +7.6

Demographics: 51% white, 21% Asian, 18% Hispanic, 7% Black

2020 general election results: Malliotakis (R, C): 53%, Rose (D, I): 47%

2022 candidates: Nicole Malliotakis (R, C), Max Rose (D)

What’s happening: It’s a 2020 rematch – under different circumstances. The prognosticators think it’s likely to stay Republican, after Nicole Malliotakis avoided redistricting doomsday in the first round of lines. In fact, Max Rose almost didn’t bother running. But you can’t entirely write off the feisty Democrat, who won the district in 2018, before it flipped back to the GOP two years later. Rose isn’t getting any support from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee or super PACs, but his fundraising has more or less kept up with Malliotakis’, and both had about $1.5 million on hand a month out from the election.

12th Congressional District

Midtown Manhattan, Upper East Side, Upper West Side

Current member: Carolyn Maloney (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +72.2

Demographics: 65% white, 14% Asian, 11% Hispanic, 5% Black 

2020 general election results: Maloney (D): 82%, Carlos Santiago-Cano (R): 16%, Steven Kolln (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Jerry Nadler (D, WFP), Mike Zumbluskas (R, C, Parent), Mike Itkis (Itkis Campaign)

What’s happening: Democrats’ redistricting mess forced two giants of New York’s congressional delegation into an ugly primary. Only one victor could emerge from the fight among Reps. Carolyn Maloney and Jerry Nadler as well as attorney Suraj Patel, and it was Nadler who will likely represent this wealthy slice of Manhattan after winning the Democratic primary. He will face Republican Mike Zumbluskas, who has raised minimal amounts of money, and third-party candidate Mike Itkis, who made news with his sex-positive platform.

13th Congressional District

Upper Manhattan and parts of the northwest Bronx

Current member: Adriano Espaillat (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +77.6

Demographics: 52% Hispanic, 23% Black, 15% white, 5% Asian

2020 general election results: Espaillat (D, WFP): 91%, Lovelynn Gwinn (R): 8%, Christopher Morris-Perry (C): 1%

2022 candidates: Espaillat (D)

What’s happening: After five years in Congress, Rep. Adriano Espaillat has become a power broker. In 2021 and 2022, Espaillat backed six winners – all Dominican American and all overlapping with his congressional district – for various New York City Council and Assembly seats. Together, they make up the “Squadriano.” Political observers marveled at his winning streak, but it came to an end when Miguelina Camilo lost to Gustavo Rivera in state Senate District 33 in August. With all that political muscle behind him – and nearly $400,000 in cash on hand, as of late September – he’s running uncontested.

14th Congressional District

Northwestern Queens and the East Bronx

Current member: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +57

Demographics: 51% Hispanic, 18% white, 16% Black, 12% Asian

2020 general election results: Ocasio-Cortez (D): 72%, John Cummings (R, C): 27%, Caruso-Cabrera (SAM): 1%

2022 candidates: Ocasio-Cortez (D, WFP), Tina Forte (R), Desi Cuellar (C)

What’s happening: While Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez faced a spirited primary challenge from TV journalist Michelle Caruso-Cabrera in 2020, Democrats knew better than to challenge the social media phenomenon this year. Despite being a frequent target of Republican attacks, AOC has attracted only unserious challengers in a district that’s even bluer than it was before redistricting. Tina Forte is a business owner who made headlines for having attended the Jan. 6 insurrection. Desi Cuellar, a formerly homeless Queens bartender, is on the Conservative Party line. AOC has been a fundraising juggernaut with about $6 million in cash on hand, as of late September, while Forte has about $60,000 and Cuellar has less than $1,000.

15th Congressional District

South Bronx, Hunts Point and Fordham

Current member: Ritchie Torres (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +70.4

Demographics: 55% Hispanic, 30% Black, 9% white, 3% Asian

2020 general election results: Torres (D): 89%, Patrick Delices (R, C): 11%

2022 candidates: Torres (D), Stylo Sapaskis (R)

What’s happening: In 2020, this seat was the race to watch in New York City. Rep. Ritchie Torres prevailed over a crowded field that included multiple high-profile political veterans to become one of the first Black, out gay members of Congress. This year, Torres benefited from incumbency by not being challenged in the primary. Stylo Sapaskis will be the Republican on the ballot but hasn’t reported any fundraising to the Federal Election Commission, as of the end of September. Torres, meanwhile, has $3.6 million in cash on hand.

16th Congressional District

Southern Westchester County and part of the northern Bronx

Current member: Jamaal Bowman (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +44

Demographics: 40% white, 29% Hispanic, 21% Black, 7% Asian

2020 general election results: Bowman (D): 84%, Patrick McManus (C): 16%

2022 candidates: Bowman (D, WFP), Miriam Flisser (R)

What’s happening: After a decisive win in 2020, Rep. Jamaal Bowman had a first term slightly marred by his struggles to balance the interests of his progressive and suburban constituents. Nonetheless, Bowman is still in a great position to fend off a challenge from Dr. Miriam Flisser on the Republican Party line. The recently redrawn district still has a strong Democratic lean, where Democrats outnumber Republicans 3 to 1. Heading into the election, Bowman had about $111,000 cash on hand, while Flisser had nearly $16,000.

17th Congressional District

Rockland County, northern Westchester County, Putnam County and parts of Dutchess County
From left to right: Sean Patrick Maloney (D, WFP), Mike Lawler (R, C) / U.S. House; Randy Monceaux

Current member: Mondaire Jones (D), who ran in the 10th District

2020 presidential results: Biden +10.2

Demographics: 64% white, 20% Hispanic, 7% Black, 5% Asian

2020 general election: Jones (D, WFP): 59%, Maureen McArdle-Schulman (R): 35%, Yehudis Gottesfeld (C): 3%, Joshua Eisen (ECL): 2%, Michael Parietti (SAM): 1%

2022 candidates: Sean Patrick Maloney (D, WFP), Mike Lawler (R, C)

What’s happening: Coming out of a chaotic redistricting process, Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney’s decision to step into Rep. Mondaire Jones’ district led Jones to run in the crowded 10th Congressional District Democratic primary, which he ultimately lost. Although he received backlash from progressive Democrats, the controversial move by Maloney didn’t stop him from soundly defeating state Sen. Alessandra Biaggi. Now Maloney will face Republican Assembly Member Mike Lawler, who has focused much of his campaign on crime and inflation. Meanwhile, Maloney has prioritized gun safety and abortion rights. As of the end of September, Maloney had nearly $1 million in cash on hand, while Lawler had about $289,000.

18th Congressional District

Mid-Hudson Valley
From left to right: Pat Ryan (D, WFP), Colin Schmitt (R, C) / Pat Ryan for Congress; Assembly

Current member: Sean Patrick Maloney (D), who is running in the 17th District

2020 presidential results: Biden +8.4

Demographics: 63% white, 18% Hispanic, 10% Black, 3% Asian

2020 general election results: Maloney (D, WFP, I): 56%, Chele Chiavacci Farley (R, C): 43%, Scott Smith (L, SAM): 1%

2022 candidates: Pat Ryan (D, WFP), Colin Schmitt (R, C)

What’s happening: Rep. Pat Ryan recently secured a win in the August special election race for the 19th Congressional District – a race that many regarded as a bellwether for the midterm elections. Now Ryan will face Republican Assembly Member Colin Schmitt for the seat currently held by Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, who decided to run in the 17th District. Ryan focused on abortion rights, following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, as a pillar of his special election campaign, and he’s running the same playbook in the general election. Meanwhile, Schmitt has focused on opposing critical race theory while attempting to flip the abortion rights issue against Ryan with an ad alleging that Ryan supports late-term abortions. Heading into the election, both candidates have an equal amount of cash on hand – about $550,000 for Ryan and $486,000 for Schmitt.

19th Congressional District

Parts of the Southern Tier, Catskills and Hudson Valley
From left to right: Josh Riley (D, WFP), Marc Molinaro (R, C) / Josh Riley for Congress; Kirkpicnic2022 (davidlivshin.com)

Current member: Pat Ryan, who won an August special election to succeed Antonio Delgado is running in the 18th District

2020 presidential results: Biden +4.6

Demographics: 80% white, 7% Hispanic, 4% Black, 4% Asian

2020 general election results: Delgado (D, WFP, SAM): 55%, Kyle Van De Water (R): 43%, Victoria Alexander (L): 1%, Steven Greenfield (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Josh Riley (D, WFP), Marc Molinaro (R, C)

What’s happening: After losing an August special election to Pat Ryan, Republican Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro finds himself locked in a tight battle for the 19th District against Democrat Josh Riley, a lawyer, former political staffer and first-time candidate. At first, Molinaro appeared to be the favorite to win the seat. He’s a moderate Republican popular in his county and has some statewide recognition after his 2018 run for governor. Even though he doesn’t technically live in the new district, which also no longer includes any part of Dutchess County, conventional wisdom gave Molinaro a leg up over a newcomer like Riley. But a lot has changed since Molinaro first announced he would challenge Antonio Delgado, who resigned to become the lieutenant governor, not least of which was Molinaro’s special election loss. Now, polling has Riley in the lead, with the gap increasing to a more comfortable margin in the past two months. Meanwhile, Molinaro finds himself running against his own party’s agenda, attempting to distance himself from the social conservatism that had many other Republicans applauding the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and planning to enact a federal abortion ban. Riley has raised nearly $1 million more than Molinaro and has more than $1.1 million in cash on hand, as of late September, compared to Molinaro’s $400,000.

20th Congressional District

The Capital Region, including Albany, Schenectady and Saratoga Springs

Current member: Paul Tonko (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +19.6

Demographics: 72% white, 9% Black, 6% Hispanic, 6% Asian

2020 general election results: Tonko (D, WFP, I): 61%, Liz Joy (R, C, SAM): 39%

2022 candidates: Tonko (D, WFP), Liz Joy (R, C)

What’s happening: Paul Tonko, the eight-term Democratic incumbent, won handily against Republican real estate agent Liz Joy in 2020. The newly drawn district voted for Biden by about 20 points instead of 21 points in the previous version, and even in a Republican wave year Tonko should have more than enough buffer to hold on to his seat, thanks in part to the many Democratic-leaning government workers in the Capital Region. Tonko has also outraised Joy, with $1.7 million to her $1 million, and has more cash on hand – nearly $1 million, compared to Joy’s roughly $125,000.

21st Congressional District

The North Country and part of the Capital Region

Current member: Elise Stefanik (R)

2020 presidential results: Trump +12.6

Demographics: 87% white, 4% Hispanic, 2% Black, 1% Asian

2020 general election results: Stefanik (R, C, I): 59%, Tedra Cobb (D, WFP): 41%

2022 candidates: Stefanik (R, C), Matt Castelli (D, Moderate)

What’s happening: Elise Stefanik’s political power skyrocketed under President Donald Trump, and she’s even more eager than most Republicans to get back the majority, where she’ll have a larger stage for her nativist politics and ideas like impeaching President Joe Biden. The new district is slightly more Republican than it was before, and she is a fundraising juggernaut, having brought in $8.4 million this cycle. Democrat Matt Castelli, a former CIA officer who’s new to the district, has successfully tapped into the national outrage and criticisms of Stefanik, raising $2 million himself, but even running hard as a “moderate” and American hero likely won’t be enough to unseat the high-ranking Republican.

22nd Congressional District

Central New York
From left to right: Francis Conole (D), Brandon Williams (R, C) / Conole for Congress; Brandon Williams Campaign

Current member: Claudia Tenney (R), who is running in the 24th District

2020 presidential results: Biden +7.6

Demographics: 76% white, 9% Black, 6% Hispanic, 4% Asian

2020 general election results: Tenney (R): 48.95%, Anthony Brindisi (D, WFP, I): 48.92%, Keith Price Jr. (L): 2%

2022 candidates: Francis Conole (D), Brandon Williams (R, C)

What’s happening: The 22nd Congressional District is among the most competitive races in the state – rated as a toss-up by Cook Political Report and Politico, while FiveThirtyEight has the Central New York seat leaning Republican. Democratic Iraq War veteran and defense policy adviser Francis Conole and Republican U.S. Navy veteran and tech entrepreneur Brandon Williams are both relatively fresh faces in New York politics. Conole ran in the 24th Congressional District in 2020 but lost by a large margin in the Democratic primary, and Williams only moved to Central New York in 2010. Voters in the district went for Biden by roughly 7 percentage points in 2020, but parts of the new district have also repeatedly elected moderate Republican Rep. John Katko over the past decade. (Katko declined to endorse either candidate.) Conole is trying to paint Williams as a MAGA Republican, but it’s unclear whether that strategy will stick with voters in this purple district. A Spectrum News/Siena College poll conducted in late September had Williams with a 45% to 40% lead. Although Conole has outraised Williams and had $527,000 on hand to Williams’ $275,000 as of the end of September, both candidates have benefited from more than $3 million in combined spending by outside groups. Williams has been helped more from that outside spending than Conole, with the Kevin McCarthy-aligned super PAC Congressional Leadership Fund dropping about $1.8 million for the Republican.

23rd Congressional District

Parts of Erie County and the Southern Tier

Current member: Joe Sempolinski (R), who won an August special election to succeed Tom Reed and is not running for reelection

2020 presidential results: Trump +18

Demographics: 88% white, 4% Hispanic, 2% Black, 1% Asian

2020 general election results: Reed (R, C, I): 58%, Tracy Mitrano (D, WFP): 41%, Andrew Kolstee (L): 1%

2022 candidates: Nick Langworthy (R, C), Max Della Pia (D)

What’s happening: State GOP Chair Nick Langworthy only narrowly beat Carl Paladino, the former Republican gubernatorial candidate known to make racist remarks, in this summer’s primary. But having shored up the Republican nomination in this new Southern Tier district, most of Langworthy’s hard work is behind him. The 23rd District is safely Republican, giving Democratic attorney Max Della Pia a hell of an uphill battle to an upset victory. Della Pia also ran in the current district’s special election in August, but lost to Republican Joe Sempolinski, who is serving a four-month term in Congress because he declined to run for reelection. Langworthy has outraised Della Pia and as of Sept. 30 had roughly $135,000 on hand to Della Pia’s $60,000.

24th Congressional District

Parts of Western New York and the North Country, including the Finger Lakes

Current member: John Katko (R), who is not running for reelection 

2022 presidential results: Trump +17.8

Demographics: 87% white, 4% Hispanic, 3% Black, 1% Asian

2020 general election results: Katko (R, C, I): 53%, Dana Balter (D): 43%, Steven Williams (WFP): 4%

2022 candidates: Claudia Tenney (R, C) Steven Holden (D) 

What’s happening: Democrats aren’t the only ones district hopping this year. Republican Rep. Claudia Tenney is jumping from the 22nd Congressional District seat she currently represents to the new 24th District seat, which is more safely red than her current district was redrawn to be earlier this year. After easily fending off challengers in the Republican primary for the seat, Tenney faces Democrat Steven Holden in the general election, but the odds are stacked against Democrats in the district. Tenney also had more than four times as much cash on hand as of Sept. 30.

25th Congressional District

Rochester and suburbs, including parts of Orleans County
From left to right: Morelle (D, WFP), La’Ron Singletary (R, C) / Somodevilla, Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Current member: Joseph Morelle (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +20.2

Demographics: 67% white, 15% Black, 10% Hispanic, 4% Asian

2020 general election results: Morelle (D, WFP, I): 59%, George Mitris (R, C): 39%, Kevin Wilson (L): 2%

2022 candidates: Morelle (D, WFP), La’Ron Singletary (R, C)

What’s happening: Few expect Rep. Joseph Morelle to lose his solid blue seat, but a challenge from La’Ron Singletary has garnered some attention. The former Rochester Police Department chief came under scrutiny following the 2020 police killing of Daniel Prude, which sparked protests across the city. After evidence emerged of an alleged cover-up of the circumstances surrounding Prude’s death, Singletary announced his resignation, although then-Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren fired him before his resignation took effect. After that, he decided to launch a long shot bid to unseat Morelle, who has held the seat since 2018 and wields significant power in Monroe County. Morelle has raised nearly $1.8 million and had less than $700,000 on hand as of late September, while Singletary has raised $541,000 and has less than $100,000 on hand.

26th Congressional District

Parts of Erie and Niagara counties, including Buffalo and Niagara Falls

Current member: Brian Higgins (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +23.8

Demographics: 65% white, 18% Black, 7% Hispanic, 6% Asian

2020 general election results: Higgins (D, WFP, SAM): 70%, Ricky Donovan Sr. (R): 29%, Michael Raleigh (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Higgins (D, WFP), Steven Sams (R, C)

What’s happening: Democrat Brian Huggins has more to be concerned about with the Buffalo Bills season than he does his own reelection. Republican Steven Sams, a disabled Army combat veteran, has raised just $16,000 from outside donors to Higgins’ $1.5 million. And having Buffalo native Gov. Kathy Hochul on the ballot should only help Higgins.

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