2022 congressional primaries

Who’s running for Congress in New York

Looking at every House race across the Empire State – which could be key to which party controls Congress.

City & State looked at every district in the state to preview both the primaries and what could lie ahead for the general.

City & State looked at every district in the state to preview both the primaries and what could lie ahead for the general. City & State

New York has lost a congressional seat. The delegation will be 26 members starting next year, down from 27. And redistricting – that whole process – resulted in as many as nine seats being up for grabs between Democrats and Republicans in this midterm election year.

But before November comes, New York also has some of the country’s hottest primaries, including an open seat on Wall Street, a career veteran showdown in Central Park and three open seats on Long Island. At the same time, two Aug. 23 special elections, in the Hudson Valley and Western New York, could serve as a preview for November. 

New Yorkers can look at the new districts, and how they changed, on the CUNY Graduate Center’s Redistricting & You site, a partnership with the Center for Urban Research. More information about the maps, 2020 presidential results and racial demographics can also be found on Dave’s Redistricting, which the court-appointed special master, Jonathan Cervas, used to submit the final maps.

City & State looked at every district in the state to preview both the primaries and what could lie ahead for the general. This information is updated as of Aug. 8.

Long Island Congressional Districts

1st Congressional District

Eastern parts of Suffolk County

Current member: Lee Zeldin (R), who is not running for reelection

2020 presidential results: Biden +0.2%

Demographics: 72% white, 16% Hispanic, 5% Asian, 4% Black, 

2020 Democratic primary results: Nancy Goroff: 36%, Perry Gershon: 35%, Bridget Fleming: 28%, Greg Fischer: 2%

2020 general election results: Zeldin (R, C, I): 55%, Goroff (D, WFP): 45%

2022 candidates: Bridget Fleming (D), Michelle Bond (R), Nick LaLota (R), Anthony Figliola (R)

What’s happening: Current Rep. Lee Zeldin is giving up the seat he’s held since 2015 to run for governor, and the general election race to succeed him will be close. 

The initial Democrat-dominated redistricting process drew much of eastern Long Island into a new, Democratic-leaning district that seemed likely to flip from red to blue. But the New York Supreme Court overturned Democrats’ maps, and the new lines have returned the 1st District to its prior swing status.

Democrats have coalesced around Suffolk County legislator Bridget Fleming, a former Manhattan prosecutor who ran in 2020 and has picked up some key union endorsements. The Republican primary features Nick LaLota, a former Village of Amityville Trustee and Suffolk County Commissioner of Elections, who has been endorsed by Suffolk County Republicans, facing off against Anthony Figliola, a former deputy supervisor for the town of Brookhaven and Michelle Bond, a cryptocurrency industry CEO, who has nearly $1 million to spend on her run, including $600,000 of her own money.

2nd Congressional District

Southern parts of Suffolk and Nassau County

Current member: Andrew Garbarino (R)

2020 presidential results: Trump +1.6%

Demographics: 56% white, 28% Hispanic, 10% Black, 3% Asian

2020 Republican primary results: Andrew Garbarino: 63%, Michael LiPetri: 36% 

2020 Democratic primary results: Jackie Gordon: 72%, Patricia Maher: 27%

2020 general election results: Garbarino (R, C, L, SAM): 53%, Jackie Gordon (D, WFP, I): 46%, Harry Burger (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Garbarino (R), Robert Cornicelli (R), Mike Rakebrandt (R), Jackie Gordon (D, WFP)

What’s happening: The 2nd District is another race that fell victim to Democrats’ redistricting snafu. The maps first approved by state legislators had packed conservatives into this Long Island based seat, ensuring a liberal leaning map in the neighboring 1st District. But when those maps were overturned there was a chaotic candidate reshuffle. Jackie Gordon, an Army veteran, high school guidance counselor and Babylon Town Council member, lost to Rep. Andrew Garbarino in the 2nd District in 2020, and after initially running in the 1st District this cycle, she is once again taking on Garbarino – in a swing district that slightly favors a Republican. The incumbent faces a GOP primary challenge from Robert Cornicelli and Mike Rakebrandt. Cornicelli is a veteran of both the Army and the Navy and works as a supervisor in the Oyster Bay Department of Public Works. Rakebrandt is an NYPD officer and Navy veteran. Both Cornicelli and Rakebrandt are challenging Garbarino from the right, saying he hasn’t been loyal enough to Trump.

3rd Congressional District

Northern parts of Nassau County and Queens

Current member: Tom Suozzi (D), who unsuccessfully challenged Gov. Kathy Hochul earlier this summer and is not running for reelection

2020 presidential results: Biden +8.1%

Demographics: 56% white, 23% Asian, 14% Hispanic, 3% Black 

2020 Democratic primary results: Tom Suozzi: 66%, Melanie D’Arrigo: 26%, Michael Weinstock: 8%

2020 general election results: Suozzi (D, WFP, I): 56%, George Santos (R, C): 43%, Howard Rabin (L): 1%

2022 candidates: Jon Kaiman (D), Josh Lafazan (D), Robert Zimmerman (D), Melanie D’Arrigo (D), Reema Rasool (D), George Santos (R)

What’s happening: Rep. Tom Suozzi abandoned this Long Island based congressional seat to run a losing campaign for governor. The newly reconfigured district now takes in much of Nassau County’s North Shore and a slice of suburban Queens. Several Democrats have thrown their hat into the ring to serve succeeding Suozzi, including former North Hempstead Town Supervisor Jon Kaiman, current Nassau County Legislator Josh Lafazan, public relations maven Robert Zimmerman, wellness professional Melanie D’Arrigo and businesswoman Reema Rasool. Lafazan has Suozzi’s support and leads in fundraising. He’s also getting major outside support from Protect Our Future, a super PAC focused on pandemic preparedness that’s funded by cryptocurrency billionaire Sam Bankman-Fried. Zimmerman, who is involved with the Democratic National Committee, has support from other party insiders including Rep. Grace Meng. D’Arrigo is the progressive choice with the Working Families Party’s backing. Republican George Santos, an investment banker who had a stint at a firm accused of operating a Ponzi scheme, is unopposed in the Republican primary and thinks he can flip the seat in a red wave year after failing to do so in 2020. 

4th Congressional District

Southern parts of Nassau County

Current member: Kathleen Rice (D), who is not running for reelection

2020 presidential results: Biden +14.6%

Demographics: 51% white, 22% Hispanic, 16% Black, 7% Asian

2020 Republican primary results: Douglas Tuman: 70%, Cindy Grosz: 28%

2020 general election results: Rice (D): 56%, Douglas Tuman (R, C): 43%, Joseph Naham (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Carrié Solages (D), Keith Corbett (D), Laura Gillen (D), Muzib Huq (D), Anthony D’Esposito (R)

What’s happening: Rep. Kathleen Rice's retirement from Congress creates an open seat in this western Long Island district. Republicans have consolidated support behind Anthony D’Esposito (R), a Town of Hempstead council member. The crowded Democratic primary includes former Town of Hempstead Supervisor Laura Gillen, who has Rice’s endorsement, Nassau County legislator Carrié Solages, prominent election attorney and Malverne Mayor Keith Corbett and Dr. Muzib Huq. Unlike other Long Island congressional seats, the 4th District saw minimal changes to its makeup during redistricting. While the area trends blue at the federal level, Republicans have remained in control of the Town of Hempstead and dominate local politics. In 2019, they knocked off Gillen in her reelection bid for Hempstead supervisor. The last time a Republican won this seat in Congress was 1996.

New York City Congressional Districts

5th Congressional District

Southeast Queens

Current member: Greg Meeks (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +62.8%

Demographics: 40% Black, 21% Hispanic, 15% Asian, 13% white 

2020 Democratic primary results: Rep. Greg Meeks: 76%, Shaniyat Chowdhury: 24% 

2020 general election results: Meeks uncontested

2022 candidates: Meeks (D), Paul King (R)

What’s happening: Rep. Greg Meeks is the current boss of the Queens County Democratic Party and a 24-year House veteran. The long-serving lawmaker represents middle-class Black homeowners in the eastern suburban swaths of the borough. Meeks has actively pushed back against the leftward drift of his party and is a proud moderate who will avoid a primary this year, after crushing a democratic socialist challenger two years ago. It’s an incredibly safe Democratic seat, but in the general election he’ll face Republican Paul King, a management consultant.

6th Congressional District

Central and northeastern Queens

Current member: Grace Meng (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +30.6%

Demographics: 45% Asian, 24% white, 24% Hispanic, 4% Black

2020 Democratic primary results: Meng: 65%, Melquiades Gagarin: 20%, Sandra Choi: 14%

2020 general election results: Meng (D, WFP): 68%, Thomas Zmich (R,L,C, Save Our City): 32%

2022 candidates: Meng (D), Zmich (R)

What’s happening: Rep. Grace Meng appears to be sailing to reelection in her bid for a sixth term. She has avoided a primary, and in the general, will apparently face Thomas Zmich, an Army veteran and building tradesman, in a rematch. The 6th Congressional District has the highest percentage of Asian Americans in New York City, and Meng is New York’s first Asian American member of Congress. Her district remained relatively unchanged during the redistricting process.

7th Congressional District

Southwestern Queens and North Brooklyn

Current member: Nydia Velázquez (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +63.2%

Demographics: 36% white, 35% Hispanic, 13% Asian, 10% Black 

2020 Democratic primary results: Velázquez (D): 78%, Paperboy Love Prince (D): 20% 

2020 general election results: Velázquez (D, WFP): 85%, Brian Kelly (R, C): 14%, Gilbert Midonnet (L): 1%

2022 candidates: Velázquez (D), Prince (D), Juan Pagán (R) 

What’s happening: Rep. Nydia Velázquez has served in Congress since 1993 and has cultivated an image as a progressive stalwart. The redrawn 7th Congressional District is substantially different from the district she currently represents, which includes Sunset Park, Red Hook and the Lower East Side. But the new one contains enough of her old constituents, as well as new, progressive-leaning constituents that would like Velázquez – that she has once again avoided a serious primary challenge. Like in 2020, performance artist Paperboy Love Prince is on the ballot, but is somehow taking this race even less seriously than they took their 2021 mayoral run. Republican Juan Pagán, an administrative aide at Baruch College and former correction officer, is also running.

8th Congressional District

Central and southern Brooklyn

Current member: Hakeem Jeffries (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +53.6%

Demographics: 42% Black, 28% white, 17% Hispanic, 9% Asian

2020 Democratic primary results: Jeffries uncontested

2020 general election results: Jeffries (D, WFP): 85%, Garfield Wallace (R, Conservative): 15%

2022 candidates: Jeffries (D), Queen Johnson (D), Yuri Dashevsky (R)

What’s happening: A former corporate attorney and Assembly member, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries has risen quickly in Congress and is now chair of the House Democratic Caucus, plus he's a presumed front-runner to succeed Nancy Pelosi as Democratic leader after she retires. Despite his high profile, the Brooklynite has remained active in local politics. In 2021, he used his perch to stifle the campaign of a leading DSA New York City Council candidate, Michael Hollingsworth, and supported the more establishment aligned Crystal Hudson. That’s just one example of Jeffries’ ire for the left, but the particulars of his district mean he isn’t vulnerable to a progressive challenge. Queen Johnson, a nonprofit organizer, is trying, but has earned no support from the progressive movement and hasn’t filed a single fundraising report. Yuri Dashevsky, a Jewish immigrant from the former Soviet Union, artist, public relations consultant and language interpreter, is waiting in the general.

9th Congressional District

Central Brooklyn

Current member: Yvette Clarke (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +51.8%

Demographics: 40% Black, 32% white, 11% Hispanic, 9% Asian

2020 Democratic primary results: Clarke: 54%, Adem Bunkeddeko: 25%, Isiah James: 10%, Chaim Deutsch: 10%

2020 general election results: Clarke (D, WFP): 83% , Constantine Jean-Pierre (R, C): 16%, Gary Popkin (L): 1%

2022 candidates: Clarke (D), Menachem Raitport (R)

What’s happening: Eight-term Rep. Yvette Clarke is running for reelection in a Brooklyn district that encompasses Crown Heights, Brownsville and Midwood. Clarke has deep ties to the Brooklyn political class – her mother was the first Caribbean-born member of the New York City Council, and she’s served in Congress since 2007. Clarke got a scare in the 2018 Democratic primary when progressive newcomer Adem Bunkeddeko came within 6 points of beating her. But Clarke left little to chance in the 2020 primary when Bunkeddeko challenged her again, running aggressively and winning a four-way primary with 54% of the vote. After redistricting, her electoral terrain has become even friendlier. The Park Slope neighborhoods that helped power Bunkeddeko’s impressive 2018 showing were drawn out of the district. She won’t have a primary and will face Menachem Raitport, a perennial candidate and Lubavitcher entrepreneur, in the general election. 

10th Congressional District

Lower Manhattan and western Brooklyn

Current member: Jerry Nadler (D), who is running in the 12th District

2020 presidential results: Biden +72% 

Demographics: 49% white, 22% Asian, 19% Hispanic, 6% Black

2020 Democratic primary results: Nadler: 67%, Lindsey Boylan: 22%, Jonathan Herzog: 10%

2020 general election results: Nadler (D, WFP): 84%, Cathy Bernstein (R, C): 14%, Michael Madrid (L): 1%

2022 candidates: Mondaire Jones (D), Jo Anne Simon (D), Daniel Goldman (D), Elizabeth Holtzman (D), Yuh-Line Niou (D), Carlina Rivera (D), Peter Gleason (D), Yan Xiong (D), Jimmy Li (D), Maud Maron (D), Quanda Francis (D), Brian Robinson (D), Benine Hamdan (R)

What’s happening: Perhaps no congressional map was more impacted by Mapgate than the newly created 10th District. The district now combines lower Manhattan, Dumbo, Park Slope and Sunset Park into a hegemonically Democratic seat. Much of it was Rep. Jerry Nadler’s district, but he chose to run in the 12th District instead, uptown. With no sitting incumbent defending the turf, the open seat attracted 13 Democratic candidates. That list includes Rep. Mondaire Jones, who moved into the district from the one he currently represents in Rockland and Westchester counties, Assembly Members Yuh-Line Niou and Jo Anne Simon, former Rep. Liz Holtzman, New York City Council Member Carlina Rivera and Daniel Goldman, former Democratic counsel during the first Trump impeachment. Former New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio will still be on the ballot after dropping out of the race after seeing weak poll numbers, but the other six leading candidates all see their own path to victory. Polling has shown a tight race, and while Jones has more money than the rest of them combined, many candidates have enough funds to get their names out – with help from key endorsers. Goldman has contributed at least $1 million of his own money to catch up with Jones, and Simon is largely self-funding as well. Republican investment banker Benine Hamdan will be waiting in the general. 

11th Congressional District

Staten Island, southwestern Brooklyn

Current member: Nicole Malliotakis (R)

2020 presidential results: Trump +7.6%

Demographics: 51% white, 18% Hispanic, 21% Asian, 7% Black

2020 Republican primary results: Nicole Malliotakis: 69%, Joe Caldarera: 31%

2020 Democratic primary results: Former Rep. Max Rose ran uncontested

2020 general election results: Rose (D, I): 47%, Malliotakis (R, C): 53%

2022 candidates: Rose (D), Brittany Ramos DeBarros (D), Komi Agoda-Koussema (D), Malliotakis (R), John Matland (R)

What’s happening: The 11th Congressional District is the only part of New York City that voted for Donald Trump in both 2016 and 2020. But Democrats have remained competitive during midterm elections. In 2018, army veteran Max Rose knocked off incumbent Dan Donovan, winning the race by 6.5 points. But the Trump phenomenon was too much to overcome and he lost his seat to current Rep. Nicole Malliotakis in 2020. Prior to Congress, Malliotakis was an Assembly member and 2017 Republican mayoral candidate. In the House, she has toed the Republican Party line and voted to decertify Joe Biden’s presidential victory. Democrats' plan to gerrymander her out of a seat failed, and she now remains a favorite to win reelection. Rose is angling for a comeback, running in the Democratic primary against democratic socialist and fellow veteran Brittany Ramos DeBarros and public school teacher Komi Agoda-Koussema. Rose has about $1.9 million on hand as of the end of June, far more than either of his primary opponents, but much less than Malliotakis’ $2.6 million. Malliotakis faces anti-vax activist John Matland in the Republican primary. Matland was fired from his job at Staten Island University Hospital for refusing to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

12th Congressional District

Midtown Manhattan, Upper East Side, Upper West Side

Current member: Carolyn Maloney (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +72.2%

Demographics: 65% white, 14% Asian, 11% Hispanic, 5% Black, 

2020 Democratic primary results: Maloney: 42.7%, Suraj Patel: 39.3%, Lauren Ashcraft: 13.6%, Pete Harrison: 4.2%

2020 general election results: Maloney (D): 82%, Carlos Santiago-Cano (R): 16%, Steven Kolln (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Maloney (D), Jerry Nadler (D), Suraj Patel (D), Ashmi Sheth (D)

What’s happening: Democrats’ redistricting mess has forced two giants of New York’s congressional delegation into an ugly primary. Reps. Carolyn Maloney and Jerry Nadler are facing off against each other to represent this wealthy slice of Manhattan. Neither politician opted to run in the open 10th District, creating a marquee election brawl. The race has taken on additional resonance, as Nadler is the only Jewish Congress person from New York City, and Maloney is touting a feminist track record in the wake of the repeal of Roe v. Wade. Democrats are being forced to choose sides between the two representatives who each have served in Congress for nearly 30 years. Suraj Patel, who came close to beating Maloney in 2018 and 2020, is hoping his newcomer message can set him apart from the two career politicians. It’s sure to be an expensive race. Maloney had about $2 million on hand as of the end of June, including $900,000 she lent her campaign from her personal fortune. Nadler had $1.2 million, and Patel had $560,000.

13th Congressional District

Upper Manhattan and parts of the northwest Bronx

Current member: Adriano Espaillat (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +77.6%

Demographics: 52% Hispanic, 23% Black, 15% white, 5% Asian

2020 Democratic primary results: Espaillat: 59%, James Felton Keith, II: 25%, Ramon Rodriguez: 15%

2020 general election results: Espaillat (D, WFP): 91%, Lovelynn Gwinn (R): 8%, Christopher Morris-Perry (C): 1%

2022 candidates: Espaillat (D) , Michael Hano (D), Francisco Spies (D)

What’s happening: After five years in Congress, Rep. Adriano Espaillat has become a power broker. He backed George Alvarez in his successful challenge to unseat Assembly Member José Rivera and recently endorsed challenger Angel Vasquez to unseat state Sen. Robert Jackson and Miguelina Camilo to unseat state Sen. Gustavo Rivera. If they prevail, those three will join the growing “Squadriano.” With all that nonstop political muscling and about $700,000 on hand as of the end of June, Espaillat is not facing serious opposition in the August primary. Neither “social democrat” Michael Hano nor Francisco Spies reported any fundraising for the race.

14th Congressional District

Northwestern Queens and the East Bronx

Current member: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +57%

Demographics: 51% Hispanic, 18% white, 16% Black, 12% Asian

2020 Democratic primary results: Ocasio-Cortez: 78%, Michelle Caruso-Cabrera: 19%, Badrun Khan: 5%, Samuel Sloan: 2%

2020 general election results: Ocasio-Cortez (D): 72%, John Cummings (R, CON): 27%, Caruso-Cabrera (SAM): 1%

2022 candidates: Ocasio-Cortez (D), Tina Forte (R), Desi Cuellar (R) 

What’s happening: While Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez faced a spirited primary challenge from TV journalist Michelle Caruso-Cabrera in 2020, in 2022, Democrats know better than to try to challenge the social media phenomenon. On the GOP side, despite being a frequent target of Republican attacks, AOC has attracted only unserious challengers in a district that’s even bluer than it was before redistricting. Tina Forte is a business owner who made headlines for having attended the Jan. 6 insurrection. Desi Cuellar, a formerly homeless Queens bartender, will also be on the Republican ticket in August. Both have less than $60,000 in their campaign accounts, compared to AOC’s $6 million. Both also gave addresses outside the district.

15th Congressional District

Parts of the South Bronx and northwest Bronx

Current member: Ritchie Torres (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +70.4%

Demographics: 55% Hispanic, 30% Black, 9% white, 3% Asian

2020 Democratic primary results: Torres: 32%, Michael Blake: 18%, Rubén Díaz Sr.: 14%, Samelys Lopez: 14%, Ydanis Rodriguez: 11%, Melissa Mark-Viverito: 4%, Chivona Newsome: 2%, Tomas Ramos: 2%

2020 general election results: Torres (D): 89%, Patrick Delices (R, C): 11%

2022 candidates: Torres (D)

What’s happening: In 2020, this seat was the race to watch in New York City. Rep. Ritchie Torres prevailed over a crowded field that included multiple high-profile political veterans to become one of the first Black, out gay members of Congress. This year, Torres is living the dream: He’s a popular incumbent with no challengers in the primary or general election, he’s got a cushy $3.2 million in his campaign account, and he was thrilled that Riverdale was redistricted into his district.

New York State Congressional Districts

16th Congressional District

Southern Westchester County and part of the northeast Bronx

Current member: Jamaal Bowman (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +44%

Demographics: 40% white, 29% Hispanic, 21% Black, 7% Asian

2020 Democratic primary results: Bowman: 55%, Eliot Engel: 41%, Chris Fink: 2%, Sammy Ravelo: 1%, Andom Ghebreghiorgis: <1%

2020 general election results: Bowman (D): 84%, Patrick McManus (CON): 16%

2022 candidates: Bowman (D), Vedat Gashi (D), Catherine Parker (D), Mark Jaffe (D), John Ciampoli (R)

What’s happening: Rep. Jamaal Bowman has struggled to please everyone during his first term in Congress. He angered the Democratic Socialists of America with his intermittent support of Israel, and he has angered suburban moderates with views on policing and the infrastructure bill they find extreme. He was openly disappointed with the redistricting process, which lost him many Black and low-income constituents. A few moderates are coming for him this election, but he’s still the heavy favorite. He’ll face off in the August primary against Westchester County Legislators Vedat Gashi and Catherine Parker, who previously ran for Congress in the 17th District, and business leader Mark Jaffe.

17th Congressional District

Rockland County, northern Westchester County, Putnam County and parts of Dutchess County

Current member: Mondaire Jones (D), who is running in the 10th District instead

2020 presidential results: Biden +10.2%

Demographics: 64% white, 21% Hispanic, 9% Black, 6% Asian

2020 Democratic primary results: Jones: 42%, Adam Schleifer: 16%, Evelyn Farkas: 16%, David Carlucci: 11%, David Buchwald: 9%, Asha Castleberry (D): 3%, Allison Fine (D): 2%, Catherine Parker (D): 2%

2020 Republican primary results: Maureen McArdle Schulman (R): 78%, Yehudis Gottesfeld (R): 22%

2020 general election: Jones (D, WFP): 59%, McArdle Schulman (R): 35%, Gottesfeld (CON): 3%, Joshua Eisen (ECL): 2%, Michael Parietti (SAM): 1%

2022 candidates: Alessandra Biaggi (D), Sean Patrick Maloney (D), Charles Falciglia (R), Michael Lawler (R) , Jack Schrepel (R), Shoshana David (R) William Faulkner (R)

What’s happening: Incumbent Rep. Mondaire Jones seemed to be sailing toward reelection. One of the first two out gay Black men elected to Congress, Jones was thought to be a rising progressive star. But New York Democrats’ redistricting incompetence has thrown Jones’ political future into chaos. The court mandated maps placed the home of DCCC Chair and neighboring Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney into the 17th District. Maloney announced plans to abandon his seat and run here – despite it being mostly represented by Jones. Jones then announced he was relocating to run for the open seat in the Brooklyn-Manhattan based 10th District, a decision he hasn’t lived down. Pre-Mapgate, state Sen. Alessandra Biaggi had been running for Congress in the gerrymandered 3rd district – comprising Long Island, Queens, and parts of her Bronx and Westchester stomping grounds. But after that map was overturned, Biaggi threw her hat into the ring for the 17th District, which overlaps not at all with her Bronx state Senate district. She is challenging Maloney from the left – with an endorsement from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Maloney took heat for his political maneuvering at the expense of a Black freshman Democrat, but has reported hefty fundraising hauls. He reported $2.5 million on hand as of the end of June compared to Biaggi’s $280,000. Internal polls from both campaigns show Maloney with a sizable lead, Politico reported, but Biaggi says she’s catching up. Republican Assembly Member Michael Lawler is facing a five-way primary, but as the only GOP candidate seriously fundraising (He had $334,000 on hand as of the end of June) and the backing of prominent local Republicans, he’s got a serious advantage. The geography is Democratic leaning but could elect a Republican in a wave year.

18th Congressional District

Mid-Hudson Valley

Current member: Sean Patrick Maloney (D), who is running in the 17th District instead

2020 presidential results: Biden +8.4%

Demographics: 63% white, 18% Hispanic, 10% Black, 3% Asian

2020 general election results: Maloney (D, WFP, I): 56%, Chele Farley (R, CON): 43%, Scott Smith (LBT, SAM): 1%

2022 candidates: Pat Ryan (D), Moses Mugulusi (D), Aisha Mills (D), Colin Schmitt (R) 

What’s happening: After incumbent Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney opted to run in a neighboring, slightly bluer district, this became an open seat. Ulster County Executive Pat Ryan faces activist Moses Mugulusi and TV journalist Aisha Mills in the Democratic primary. Ryan is simultaneously running in a special election in the current 19th District to serve out the rest of Antonio Delgado’s term after Delgado resigned to become New York’s lieutenant governor. A Democrat-Republican showdown in a purple district, it’ll be an early indicator of how the midterms are looking for Democrats. Back in the 18th, Republican Assembly Member Colin Schmitt is running unopposed for the GOP nomination. While the Hudson Valley is liberal leaning, the general election could be competitive in a conservative wave election. On Schmitt’s campaign page, the Republican has highlighted critical race theory, strong borders and cancel culture as some of his top issues.

19th Congressional District

Parts of the Southern Tier, Catskills and Hudson Valley

Current member: Vacant, after Antonio Delgado (D) resigned to become lieutenant governor

2020 presidential results: Biden +4.6%

Demographics: 80% white, 7% Hispanic, 4% Black, 4% Asian

2020 Republican primary results: Kyle Van De Water (R): 57%, Ola Hawatmeh (R): 43%

2020 general election results: Delgado (D, WFP, SAM): 55%, Kyle Van De Water (R): 43%, Victoria Alexander (L): 1%, Steven Greenfield (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Josh Riley (D), Jamie Cheney (D), Marc Molinaro (R) 

What’s happening: The 19th District is one of the most competitive House seats in New York – and the country. And right now, no one’s serving in it. It’s an open seat after Antonio Delgado resigned to become New York’s lieutenant governor. In a special election to finish out Delgado’s term representing the district in its current shape (scheduled for the same day as the primary election), Ulster County Executive Pat Ryan is running against Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro. That election will be a bellwether for purple districts across the country as Democrats panic about losing their slim House majority. (Ryan’s also running in a primary to represent the redrawn 18th District at the same time.) In the Democratic primary to represent the new 19th District, lawyer and former political staffer Josh Riley, an attorney and former aide to U.S. Sen. Al Franken, has support from the Working Families Party and the fundraising edge on Rhinebeck businesswoman and farmer Jamie Cheney. Cheney has focused her campaign on bread and butter economics, hoping to appeal across the aisle, as well as sharing her own story of getting an abortion. Whoever wins the primary will take on Molinaro in the general election in November. Molinaro is shying away from cultural conservatism, focusing on inflation, the opioid epidemic and mental health issues. He’s known statewide after running for governor in 2018, but the new 19th District doesn’t include any of his current constituents in Dutchess County – or Molinaro’s own home.

20th Congressional District

The Capital Region, including Albany, Schenectady and Saratoga County

Current member: Paul Tonko (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +19.6%

Demographics: 72% white, 9% Black, 6% Hispanic, 6% Asian

2020 general election results: Tonko (D, WFP, I): 61%, Elizabeth Joy (R, CON, SAM): 39%

2022 candidates: Tonko (D), Rostislav Rar (D), Elizabeth Joy (R)

What’s happening: Rep. Paul Tonko last won this district handily against Elizabeth Joy in the 2020 general election. After court-ordered redistricting, this Central New York-based seat grew slightly more Democratic. Tonko looks in a solid place to maintain his seat in Congress this coming election season. He hasn’t dealt with a primary challenger since 2008, but is facing immigration attorney Rostislav Rar in the August primary. Joy, a Republican from the Adirondacks with backing from Rep. Elise Stefanik, will be trying to unseat the Democratic primary victor once again.

21st Congressional District

The North Country and part of the Capital Region

Current member: Elise Stefanik (R)

2020 presidential results: Trump +12.6%

Demographics: 87% white, 4% Hispanic, 2% Black, 1% Asian

2020 general election results: Stefanik (R, CON, I): 59%, Tedra Cobb (D, WFP): 41%

2022 candidates: Stefanik (R), Matthew Putorti (D), Matt Castelli (D)

What’s happening: Rep. Elise Stefanik is a GOP star who is on a (pretty successful) mission to get more Republican women elected in Congress. She’s a favorite of Donald Trump’s, and her name has been floated for everything from his 2024 running mate to GOP whip. Two Democrats are competing in the primary to take on Stefanik in the general election. Matt Putorti, a Whitehall native and attorney and Matt Castelli, who most prominently served as director for counterterrorism in former President Barack Obama’s National Security Council. While Stefanik faces no opposition in her primary, she has used her influence to mobilize voters in other New York congressional primaries. Notably, she endorsed fringe right-wing candidate Carl Paladino for an open seat in the 23rd District. The move has fostered a Republican civil war. Whether or not any of that drama dents Stefanik’s standing back home remains to be seen.

22nd Congressional District

Central New York

Current member: Claudia Tenney (R), who is running in the 24th District instead

2020 presidential results: Biden +7.6% 

Demographics: 76% white, 9% Black, 6% Hispanic, 4% Asian

2020 Republican primary results: Tenney: 60%, George Phillips: 40%

2020 general election results: Tenney (R): 49%, Anthony Brindisi (D, WFP, I): 49%, Keith Price, Jr. (L): 2%

2022 candidates: Francis Conole (D), Sam Roberts (D), Sarah Klee Hood (D), Chol Majok (D), Brandon Williams (R), Steve Wells (R)

What’s happening: Incumbent Republican Rep. Claudia Tenney is choosing to run in the new, much redder 24th District, leaving this Central New York seat surrounding Syracuse wide open. It favored Biden in the 2020 presidential election, but there are serious candidates in both Democratic and Republican primaries. Democratic veteran and national defense adviser Francis Conole had raised nearly $1 million by the end of June, and had more than $400,000 on hand. He’s also getting major outside support from Protect Our Future, a super PAC focused on pandemic preparedness that’s funded by cryptocurrency billionaire Sam Bankman-Fried. Conole lost badly to Democrat Dana Balter in the 2020 primary for the partially overlapping 24th District. Sam Roberts is aiming for a comeback after serving as a Democratic member of the Onondaga County Legislature and in the Assembly before then-Gov. Andrew Cuomo appointed him state welfare commissioner in 2015. He’s raised nearly $100,000 and has $70,000 on hand. Democratic Air Force veteran Sarah Klee Hood has raised $111,000 and has $18,000 on hand. Former state Senate aide and former Syracuse Common Councilor Chol Majok, had about $24,000 on hand out of $28,000 raised. On the GOP side, two prominent business leaders are battling it out. Navy veteran and businessman Brandon Williams has raised about $170,000 and still has $112,000 on hand and American Food and Vending Corp. founder Steve Wells raised $600,000 and had spent almost none of that as of the end of June.

23rd Congressional District

Parts of Erie County and the Southern Tier

Current member: Vacant, after Tom Reed (R) resigned for a private sector job

2020 presidential results: Trump +18%

Demographics: 88% white, 4% Hispanic, 2% Black, 1% Asian

2020 general election results: Reed (R, C, I): 58%, Tracy Mitrano (D, WFP): 41%, Andrew Kolstee (L): 1%

2022 candidates: Carl Paladino (R), Nick Langworthy (R), Max Della Pia (D), Joe Sempolinski (R)

What’s happening: No race has shown the stark divides in today’s Republican Party more than the campaign for this Erie County anchored district. After the Uvalde, Texas, school shooting, Republican Rep. Chris Jacobs (who currently represents the 27th District, which overlaps with the newly drawn 23rd District) stated his support for modest gun reform efforts – a decision which led to intense backlash from conservatives. In the face of that anger, Jacobs announced he was not running for reelection. The same day as that announcement, Rep. Elise Stefanik endorsed Carl Paladino for the newly open seat. Paladino, the 2010 GOP gubernatorial nominee, has long been controversial for racist remarks, including about former President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama. In a recently unearthed interview, Paladino praised the leadership abilities of Adolf Hitler. Stefanik’s move was seen as a way to box out the candidacy of New York State GOP Chair Nick Langworthy. Soon after Paladino announced, Langworthy jumped into the race. The campaign has forced local Republicans to choose sides and become a new development in the proxy war between Stefanik and Langworthy. Their feud reportedly began when Langworthy endorsed Lee Zeldin for governor – even as Stefanik was contemplating her own bid. Paladino’s fringe views will test how far Republican voters are willing to go in looking past extremism and test the growing influence of rising Republican star Stefanik. The winner will face Democratic Air Force veteran and attorney Max Della Pia in the general. 

But before all that, Della Pia will be facing off against Republican Joe Sempolinski in an Aug. 23 special election in the current lines of the 23rd Congressional District, stretching across the Southern Tier. Reed resigned in May, necessitating the special. It’s a safe red district, and Republican turnout should be high that day given the primary between Paladino and Langworthy, so Sempolinski is all but guaranteed victory. But the chair of the Steuben County Republican Committee – a former Reed staffer – will effectively be a four-month placeholder in the Republican minority, since he isn’t running for any other seat for a full term. 

24th Congressional District

Parts of Western New York and the North Country, including the Finger Lakes

Current member: John Katko (R), who is not running for reelection 

2022 presidential results: Trump +17.8%

Demographics: 87% white, 4% Hispanic, 3% Black, 1% Asian

2020 Democratic primary results: Dana Balter: 63%, Francis Conole: 37%

2020 general election results: Katko (R, C, I): 53%, Balter (D): 43%, Steven Williams (WFP): 4%

2022 candidates: Claudia Tenney (R), Mario Fratto (R), George Phillips (R), Steven Holden (D) 

Rep. Claudia Tenney very narrowly defeated Democrat Anthony Brindisi in 2020 with a margin of just 1,000 votes after Brindisi himself flipped her seat blue in a close race in 2018. That rivalry is over for now – she’s running for a newly redistricted seat that is much more Republican-friendly. But she’s facing two challengers: attorney and granite business owner Mario Fratto is calling her a carpet-bagger who is too supportive of gun control and immigrants. And educator and perennial candidate George Phillips, who primaried Tenney in 2020 and 2016 and lost decisively both times, is back again. With more than $1 million on hand, Tenney has a significant fundraising advantage. Democrat and veteran Steven Holden will face the primary winner in November.

25th Congressional District

Rochester and suburbs, including parts of Orleans County

Current member: Joseph Morelle (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +20.2%

Demographics: 67% white, 15% Black, 10% Hispanic, 4% Asian

2020 Democratic primary results: Morelle: 68%, Robin Wilt: 32%

2020 general election results: Morelle (D, WFP, I): 59%, George Mitris (R, C): 39%, Kevin Wilson (L): 2%

2022 candidates: Morelle (D), La’Ron Singletary (R)

What’s happening: Democratic Rep. Joseph Morelle was able to stave off progressive challenger Robin Wilt in the 2020 primary and defeated Republican George Mitris in the general election the same year. He’s represented this safely blue district since 2018 after the passing of longtime Rep. Louise Slaughter. His Republican opponent, La’Ron Singletary, has a controversial history specifically in Rochester. He previously served with the Rochester Police Department for 20 years, and as police chief since 2019. He resigned and then was fired after the killing of Daniel Prude that set off furious protests and public outcry and subsequent investigation into the department’s practices during Prude’s arrest and death. There won’t be primaries here, but both candidates have significant funds as they look toward the general: Morelle had raised more than $1 million as of the end of June and had about $705,000 on hand. Singletary raised about $380,000 and had about $265,000 on hand.

26th Congressional District

Parts of Erie and Niagara counties, including Buffalo and Niagara Falls

Current member: Brian Higgins (D)

2020 presidential results: Biden +23.8%

Demographics: 65% white, 18% Black, 7% Hispanic, 6% Asian

2020 general election results: Higgins (D, WFP, SAM): 70%, Ricky Donovan Sr. (R): 29%, Michael Raleigh (G): 1%

2022 candidates: Higgins (D), Emin “Eddie” Egriu (D), Steven Sams (R)

What’s happening: Rep. Brian Higgins has represented the 26th Congressional District since 2005, and new redistricting has all but guaranteed that the district will remain a Democratic stronghold. He did not deal with a primary in 2020, but will be facing builder and community activist Eddie Egriu this go-round. Egriu had previously run for a seat in the 26th Congressional District in 2014, but was disqualified as 58% of the signatures submitted by his campaign for certification were declared invalid. Egriu survived another legal challenge to his petitions in this race. Higgins’ $1.6 million on hand dwarfs Egriu’s $5,000. On the GOP side, veteran Steven Sams will compete in the general election.

– with reporting from Candace Pedraza

Corrections and clarifications: This story has been updated to better reflect 19th District Democratic candidate Jamie Cheney’s platform, 21st District Democratic candidate Matt Castelli’s residence, and the state of the 23rd District special election.

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